Dental assisting school in Atlanta, GA

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A Bright Future Lies Ahead

A wise person once said, “The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.”

At Dental Assisting 101, we believe that everyone deserves a chance to enjoy a career doing what they love. Unfortunately, many men and women in Georgia settle for soulless, thankless jobs with no upward mobility. If you are stuck in a job just to pay the bills, your opportunity to make a change and build a better life is here.

Unlike traditional colleges, we offer our students an expedited pathway to success through a hands-on educational approach where students learn by doing. One of the best ways to secure your future and set yourself up for success is to learn from the best. That’s exactly what you’ll get when you enroll in our dental assisting school in Atlanta, GA. We pride ourselves on having one of the most effective dental assisting courses in the state, where most students find a position within 60 days of graduation.

When it comes to decisions, choosing a new career path is one of the most important of your life. It’s not an easy choice, and it can be even harder to juggle your current responsibilities while you study and attend class. That is why we offer both in-person and online course structures, focusing on teaching practical skills that you will use every day as a dental assistant. When you choose Assisting 101, you can rest easy knowing you won’t spend valuable time trying to discern complicated lectures or irrelevant tasks. Instead, you will learn crucial skills that will set you apart from your peers and help you begin a new life-changing career in the dental industry.

When you enroll in our dental assisting school, you will reap the benefits of:

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Choosing Your Dental Assisting Course in Atlanta, GA

At Assisting 101, students have their choice of two unique dental assisting programs in Atlanta. Both programs consist of 78 hours of lecture and 48 hours of in-depth, hands-on training at one of the best dental offices in metro Atlanta. Both programs allow students to build a career in dentistry with the help of real dentists and dental assistants.

Students can choose from two different course programs:
on-site and online.

Online Dental Assistant Course

Our online program is ideal for those students that like to complete training at their own pace. If you are an eager student willing to study every day and want to complete this program in as little as one month, you can do so. However, if you would like to take more time to manage other life responsibilities, you have the choice of completing this course in less than six months.

When you choose our online dental assisting course, you will have the opportunity to:

Online Program

10 online academic sessions equal to 78 hours of academic lectures and 30 hours of hands on training.

On-Site Dental Assistant Course

Our on-site dental assisting program is perfect for students who do not have to travel long distances to our facility or need to “rush” to complete the course.

This program is more in line with a traditional college experience and gives students the opportunity to:

On-Site Program

This program is the traditional 10 week long program that will consist of in office-lectures and training on Saturdays from 9 am till 5 pm.

Why Choose a Career in the Dental Industry?

According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of dental assistants is expected to grow 11% over the next 10 years – faster than the average job growth of many other industries. New and ongoing evidence suggests an important link between a person’s overall health and their oral health. Because of this, demand for dental-related services is expected to stay strong for years to come. Dental offices in Georgia and other states must meet this projected demand. As such, the need for trained dental assistants will continue to grow.

As Baby Boomers grow older and as more men and women practice good oral hygiene, the need to treat and maintain one’s teeth will lead to an increased need for quality dental care. Over the next decade, the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that nearly 24,000 new dental assisting jobs will be created. That means the future is bright for any student who has been educated through our dental assisting courses in Atlanta.

Quick Facts About Dental Assistant Careers Over the Next 10 Years

What Does a Dental Assistant Do?

As a professional dental assistant, you will be tasked with managing a wide range of administrative and clinical responsibilities at a dental office. Dental assistants play a crucial role in the day-to-day workflow involved in a dental practice. They work alongside hygienists and dentists to provide patients with the highest quality oral care in the state of Georgia.

Common dental assistant job duties may include:

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Why Attend a Dental Assisting School in Atlanta, GA?

They say the best way to predict the future is to create it, and that is exactly what you will be doing when you enroll at Assisting 101. We believe in getting our students ready for a lifelong career, not just a job that pays the bills. When you attend our award-winning dental assisting school, you are investing in a future rich with opportunity.

Unlike other workers who choose not to attend school for legitimate training, our students enjoy a quick start in a vibrant job market where financial and personal growth are common.  When you become a dental assistant after graduation, you will have confidence knowing you are well-prepared for a life-changing career.

Here are some of the most common reasons why our students say they choose to attend our dental assisting school:

 

Happy Career!  Happy Life!
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Work in an Ever-Growing Industry

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that job growth for dental assistants is growing at a faster rate than most other industries. This bodes well for our students, who will have job security as they navigate the workforce. In a time where many jobs are being replaced by robotics and other technological advances, the skills that you learn at Assisting 101 can help you for the rest of your life.

Ability to Make a Difference

When you are a dental assistant, you plan a crucial role in your dental office. But as an ambassador of the profession, you also help educate patients about the benefits of good oral hygiene. Given the ties between heart health and oral health, you are making more of a difference than you might realize.

Fulfilling Balance Between Life and Work

The work/life balance in the U.S is a problem. Spending every waking hour at the office instead of home with family can be draining at best and depressing at worst. Unlike other professionals, dental assistants typically enjoy normal working hours during the business week. That means they have more free time to dedicate to their children and families.

Opportunity for Professional Growth

When students graduate from Assisting 101 and accept a job as a dental assistant, many choose to make it their lifelong career. For others, the role of dental assistant is just the beginning – a steppingstone to a role with more responsibility. After only a few years as a dental assistant in Atlanta, the chance to become a manager or supervisor will become much more likely. The sky is the limit!

The Time for Change is Now

Assisting 101 was founded on the concept of helping individuals through our unique and enhanced training programs to achieve a more rewarding career in a professional environment. If you’re fed up with being fed up and are ready to start fresh with a clean slate, contact us today at (678) 888-5198. We would be happy to tell you more about our school, our courses, and our class schedule.
If you’re craving a happy career and happy life, the time for a change is now.

Latest News in Atlanta, GA

Taking stock of Grissom, other SS, LF options

This story was excerpted from Mark Bowman’s Braves Beat newsletter. To read the full newsletter, click here. And subscribe to get it regularly in your inbox.With a little more than three weeks before Braves pitchers and catchers report to Spring Training, I have a feeling gener...

This story was excerpted from Mark Bowman’s Braves Beat newsletter. To read the full newsletter, click here. And subscribe to get it regularly in your inbox.

With a little more than three weeks before Braves pitchers and catchers report to Spring Training, I have a feeling general manager Alex Anthopoulos may still make a move to lessen concerns about who will serve as his primary left fielder and shortstop this year.

But with options limited, there is certainly a possibility the Braves will open the season with Eddie Rosario as their primary left fielder and either Orlando Arcia or Vaughn Grissom as their shortstop. They can win with this arrangement. But they also could improve at both positions.

Arcia can certainly handle the everyday shortstop role he filled for the Brewers from 2017-20, but he has been more productive in a backup role. As for Grissom, it’s encouraging that he has continued to show his work ethic and dedication by spending time with third-base coach and infield guru Ron Washington last summer.

But while I have the utmost respect for how Washington has positively impacted the careers of many infielders, I don’t know if he’s a miracle worker. Could he prepare Grissom over the course of another full year? Maybe. But I don’t know if a few weeks during the offseason and Spring Training is enough to get the infielder to where he needs to be.

When I first saw Grissom during Minor League Spring Training last year, I asked about him and was told he might eventually become a second baseman or third baseman. As the next couple of months unfolded, other scouts expressed doubt about his ability to be an everyday shortstop at the big league level.

So, I have my doubts about Grissom’s ability to replace Dansby Swanson. Let’s not forget this young infielder began last year at High-A and arrived in the Majors by early August. The Braves don’t win the NL East without him producing a .956 OPS through his first 26 games. But he didn’t look comfortable at second base, and he tallied a .460 OPS over the 53 plate appearances that followed.

Grissom is a great kid who seems destined to have a long, successful career. But I just don’t know if he’s ready to be the everyday shortstop for a World Series contender. Whoever is placed at that position will significantly impact the value received from Max Fried, Kyle Wright, Spencer Strider and the rest of the pitching staff.

The external options are limited. Elvis Andrus stands as the best option on the free agent market. Andrus had some offensive success after moving from the A’s to the White Sox late last season. And we know he has a strong relationship with Washington, who was his former manager in Texas.

Still, Arcia or Grissom start to look more attractive if Andrus’ potential one-year cost goes too far above the $6 million mark. Or maybe there’s a trade that could bring a shortstop to Atlanta. I just don’t see the Braves beginning the season without upgrading at this position.

As for left field, the best hope is that Rosario becomes the latest to shine in a walk year. The veteran outfielder showed reduced power after his vision issues were fixed last season, and he is an average defender at best in left field. Jordan Luplow, Eli White and Sam Hilliard only provide value in a platoon role or as a late-inning defensive replacement.

Quite honestly, I’d put Grissom in left field during Spring Training just to see if he could handle that position on an everyday basis. He’s certainly athletic enough to handle the position defensively. If there’s a desire to put his bat in the lineup every day, this should at least be an option.

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Mark Bowman has covered the Braves for MLB.com since 2001.

Analyzing Drake London, Olamide Zaccheaus, state of wide receivers -- Falcons Breakdown

Editor's Note: The 'Falcons Breakdown' series analyzes the state of every position group in Atlanta. We'll take a look back at the group's overall production in 2022, who we think will stay in 2023 and who could be on the chopping block. We'll also pinpoint the position's biggest question of the offseason.The Falcons' offense saw significant growth across the offensive line and in their rushing attack compared to the 2021 season, but the production from the wide receivers unit remained an area of con...

Editor's Note: The 'Falcons Breakdown' series analyzes the state of every position group in Atlanta. We'll take a look back at the group's overall production in 2022, who we think will stay in 2023 and who could be on the chopping block. We'll also pinpoint the position's biggest question of the offseason.

The Falcons' offense saw significant growth across the offensive line and in their rushing attack compared to the 2021 season, but the production from the wide receivers unit remained an area of concern. There were no receivers that surpassed 900 receiving yards for the second season in a row, and only 10 out of the Falcons' 38 total touchdowns this season came from the position group.

Not having a dynamic passing attack was a primary factor for the Falcons relying heavily on the run game. Receivers played a major role in that.

Drake London had an efficient rookie season. He showed growth and consistency throughout the course of the year, with a late-season surge that helped him lead all Falcons receivers with 866 yards. No other wideout eclipsed 600.

London's contractual terms makes him the only receiver certain to return in 2023, which lend to the possibility that this position group may look completely different at the start of next season. The Falcons may leverage free agency to acquire a notable wide receiver to compliment London's production.

Let's take a look at the state of the wide receivers room:

2022 production:

Drake London: 17 games | 72 receptions for 866 yards | four touchdowns | 12.03 Yds/Rec | three fumbles | broke the franchise record for most receptions by a rookie wide receiver in their first season

Olamide Zaccheaus: 17 games | 40 receptions for 533 yards | three touchdowns | 13.33 Yds/Rec | zero fumbles

Damiere Byrd: 14 games | 13 receptions for 268 yards | two touchdowns | 20.62 Yds/Rec | zero fumbles

KhaDarel Hodge: 16 games | 13 receptions for 202 yards | one touchdown | 15.54 Yds/Rec | zero fumbles

Frank Darby: 5 games | one reception for 15 yards | zero touchdowns | 15.0 Yds/Rec | zero fumbles

Who stays: Drake London, KhaDarel Hodge

On the chopping block: Frank Darby, Damiere Byrd, Olamide Zaccheaus

Biggest offseason question: Who will the Falcons look to bring back from the 2022 team? London is a definite; Zaccheaus, Hodge, and Byrd will all be unrestricted free agents. Lastly, Darby will have to earn a roster spot.

What may separate Hodge are his contributions to the special teams unit. That could play a factor in him returning to Atlanta next season.

"He's made a name for himself as a special teams player," special teams coordinator Marquice Williams said in a Dec. 21 press conference. "If you look back where he played initially [with] the Los Angeles Rams, and then he [also] really made an impact when he was with the Cleveland Browns as a special teams player. I've always admired his career from afar and it's a blessing to have him on our team."

Zaccheaus was the second-leading receiver this season with 533 yards and proved to be a reliable player throughout his career in Atlanta. Bringing him back as a third or fourth receiver might be an option. Byrd made some explosive plays this year, but only had 13 receptions for 268 yards. Both players are speedy receivers who can make multiple guys miss when in open field, however, Atlanta has more cap space this offseason and may look to bring in another agile receiver to deliver greater production in this position group.

New York Knicks at Atlanta Hawks odds, picks and predictions

The New York Knicks (25-21) battle the Atlanta Hawks (23-22) Friday with tip from State Farm Arena set for 7:30 p.m. ET. Below, we analyze Tipico Sportsbook’s lines around the Knicks vs. Hawks odds, and make our expert ...

The New York Knicks (25-21) battle the Atlanta Hawks (23-22) Friday with tip from State Farm Arena set for 7:30 p.m. ET. Below, we analyze Tipico Sportsbook’s lines around the Knicks vs. Hawks odds, and make our expert NBA picks and predictions.

The Hawks beat the Dallas Mavericks 130-122 in a primetime showdown Wednesday, covering as a 2.5-point road underdog. Atlanta has covered 3 in a row yet is 5-5 against the spread (ATS) in its last 10. The Hawks are 12-9 straight up at home. Their offense ranks 10th in points per game (115.4).

The Knicks lost to the Washington Wizards 116-105 Wednesday, failing to cover as a 5.5-point home favorite. New York is 24-20-2 ATS on the season and 6-4 ATS in its last 10 games. It is 14-8 straight up on the road. The Knicks’ defense ranks 2nd in the league in opponents’ FG percentage (44.9%).

Knicks at Hawks odds

Provided by Tipico Sportsbook; access USA TODAY Sports Scores and Sports Betting Odds hub for a full list. Lines last updated at 9:29 a.m. ET.

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Knicks at Hawks key injuries

Knicks

Hawks

For most recent updates: Official NBA injury report.

Knicks at Hawks picks and predictions

Hawks 118, Knicks 114

PASS.

Considering the value difference between the moneyline and spread, I’d back the Hawks and give the points here.

BET HAWKS -2.5 (-112).

The Knicks are 4-4 straight up without Robinson, with all their losses coming by double figures and only 1 win by that amount. The absence of Robinson will make C Clint Capela more effective.

While New York will do its best to exploit Young, G Dejounte Murray and F De’Andre Hunter will likely stick G Jalen Brunson and F RJ Barrett. The defensive abilities Atlanta has there should slow down the Knicks’ key weapons.

The Knicks are also 0-2 ATS in their last 2 while Atlanta is surging, covering 3 in a row and winning 4 in a row. At home, back the HAWKS -2.5 (-112).

LEAN OVER 229.5 (-115).

The Hawks have gone Over in 2 straight, scoring at least 120 in each of those games. They are 25-20 O/U this season. The Knicks are 23-22-1, so both teams have been better at hitting the projected Over. New York is 4-3-1 O/U in its last 8 games.

Both teams are averaging over 114 points per game this season. The Hawks rank 9th in the NBA in pace and should push the tempo at home against a rival. Back the OVER 228.5 (-105).

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Braves, Kevin Pillar Agree To Minor League Deal

The Braves and outfielder Kevin Pillar are in agreement on a minor league deal, reports MLBTR’s Steve Adams. Pillar will make a $3MM salary if he cracks the club’s roster. He’s a client of All Bases Covered Sports Managem...

The Braves and outfielder Kevin Pillar are in agreement on a minor league deal, reports MLBTR’s Steve Adams. Pillar will make a $3MM salary if he cracks the club’s roster. He’s a client of All Bases Covered Sports Management.

Pillar, 34, was selected by the Blue Jays in the 32nd round of the 2011 draft. He worked his way up to the majors by 2013 and took over an everyday job in 2015, which he held with the Jays through 2018. Over those four seasons, Pillar got into 601 games and hit .263/.301/.401. That production was 12% below league average by measure of wRC+, but Pillar was able to provide value with his speed and defense. He stole 68 bases in that period while producing 57 Defensive Runs Saved and got a 29.4 grade from Ultimate Zone Rating.

The Jays went into a rebuild in the latter parts of that timeframe and they flipped Pillar to the Giants in April of 2019. That began the journeyman phase of Pillar’s career, as he’s suited up for the Giants, Red Sox, Rockies, Mets and Dodgers over the past few campaigns. He’s continued to hit at a similar rate but his work in the field has naturally slipped as he’s gotten deeper into his 30s.

The most significant variant for Pillar this year will likely be his health. He signed a minor league deal with the Dodgers last year and posted a huge .315/.412/.622 batting line in 36 Triple-A games. That production led to a 150 wRC+, indicating he was 50% above league average. He got selected to the big league team in May but was placed on the injured list after appearing in just four games due to a left shoulder fracture. That injury required surgery which was initially reported as “season-ending,” though Pillar did attempt a late-season comeback by starting a rehab assignment in September. There wasn’t quite enough runway for Pillar to return, however, and his season was limited to just those four contests.

For the Braves, two of their outfield jobs are spoken for by Ronald Acuña Jr. and Michael Harris II. The left field position is less settled, with various in-house options. Eddie Rosario. Marcell Ozuna, Sam Hilliard, Eli White and Jordan Luplow will likely be battling each other for either full- or part-time work with the big league club. If Pillar is healthy and looks good in spring or as the season gets going, he could work his way into the mix if an opportunity presents itself.

Pillar’s $3MM salary is larger than most players on minor league deals normally secure, which is somewhat noteworthy for a club that’s slated to go into luxury tax territory for the first time. Roster Resource currently pegs their competitive balance tax figure at $241MM, beyond the $233MM base threshold. Assuming they don’t find a way to shed some salary and dip back beneath the line, they’re lined up to pay a 20% tax on all spending that goes over the boundary, which would include Pillar’s salary if he makes the team.

Why 2022 offered optimism for the future of the Atlanta Falcons

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. -- Atlanta Falcons general manager Terry Fontenot and coach Arthur Smith sat at a table last Wednesday and for the first time since they took over, they could approach an offseason differently.After two seasons of roster overhauling and eliminating issues with the salary cap, they could spend the next couple of months figuring out what they need and what they want to add without worrying as much about how to pay f...

FLOWERY BRANCH, Ga. -- Atlanta Falcons general manager Terry Fontenot and coach Arthur Smith sat at a table last Wednesday and for the first time since they took over, they could approach an offseason differently.

After two seasons of roster overhauling and eliminating issues with the salary cap, they could spend the next couple of months figuring out what they need and what they want to add without worrying as much about how to pay for it.

“We had a plan from the very beginning, and now we’re in the next phase of that,” Fontenot said. “This is going to be a different offseason than we’ve had in the previous years. Yet, we’re still going to be smart, we’re still going to handle things the right way, we’re still going to set parameters and have discipline with everything that we do.”

With that in mind, there has been clear progress from when they took over -- and not just in creating cap space, of which Atlanta will have at least $70 million at this point for 2023.

While the on-field progress might be hard to see after back-to-back 7-10 seasons to start Smith’s time in Atlanta, it’s also easy to understand that the 7-10 put together in 2021, with a veteran roster soon to be purged, and the 7-10 put together in 2022 with a roster mostly comprised of young players on their rookie NFL contracts or veterans on one-year deals, are vastly different.

The 7-10 in 2021 was within the range of expectation. The 7-10 in 2022 exceeded most expectations, including the sharp minds in Las Vegas, who had the over-under for Falcons wins in 2022 between 4.5 and 5.5.

“Write whatever you all want. You guys ranked us 45th. You buried us in May. Bury us again,” Smith said after the Falcons blew a 16-point lead in Week 1, losing to the Saints. “We don't care. We'll get back to work.”

Atlanta proved that all season. The Falcons were outclassed once -- a blowout loss at Cincinnati. Everyone else Atlanta played? Win or lose, the Falcons hung around. That’s a barometer for progress with the Falcons and what Smith and Fontenot are trying to build.

It begins in two places: The coaching staff and the young core.

Getting the Falcons to 7-10 in 2022 was a very good coaching job by Smith and his staff. Were there missteps? Sure. But this is also a team last season that never really seemed to give in. Example: When Atlanta was eliminated after Week 16, the Falcons went out and won their final two games.

This might seem unimportant. It might annoy some because of draft positioning lost. When you’re trying to build something, continuing the same message is more important than one or two draft slots.

“The culture here has kind of been set as far as what they expect and everything like that,” veteran safety Erik Harris said. “The record doesn’t reflect that, as far as how close of a locker room we are and everything, but I think this is a really special group.”

Harris is one of the many players the Falcons may or may not have back in 2023 – he’s a free agent. But the difference is while a lot of moves were inevitable last offseason, Atlanta now has a group to build around for the next five years.

The reasons for optimism can start here. Atlanta’s leading rusher, Tyler Allgeier (1,035 yards), was a rookie. So was their leading receiver, Drake London, who had 72 catches for 866 yards and four touchdowns. Kyle Pitts, their No. 1 tight end, injured most of the season, is 22 years old entering his third year.

Left tackle Jake Matthews is tied to the team until 2026. Center Drew Dalman has two years left on his rookie contract, and the Falcons have enough cap space (at least $70 million) to extend Pro Bowl right guard Chris Lindstrom, who will be entering his fifth-year option season in 2023, and bring back right tackle Kaleb McGary if they would like to. A core of the offensive line could be set for the next few years.

While there are questions about quarterback -- Atlanta needs to decide if rookie Desmond Ridder is its starter -- but Smith said at different times he’s been “pretty pleased” and “certainly encouraged” by Ridder’s development.

In four starts, Ridder completed 63.5% of his passes for 708 yards, two touchdowns and no interceptions. He also ran 16 times for 64 yards.

Defensively, Atlanta has one of its centerpiece players, tackle Grady Jarrett, under contract until after the 2025 season. It has a linebacker the team believes in with three years left on a rookie contract in Troy Andersen. A.J. Terrell is entering the last year of his rookie deal, but it would be surprising to see the Falcons not pick up his fifth-year option. Safety Richie Grant showed marked improvement from his rookie season, too, finishing second on the team in tackles (123) and passes defensed (seven) while tying with Mykal Walker and Jaylinn Hawkins for the team lead in interceptions (two). And before his knee injury, defensive lineman Ta'Quon Graham showed potential playing next to Jarrett.

Last year’s second-round pick, Arnold Ebiketie, showed flashes as an edge rusher with 11 quarterback hits and 2.5 sacks, but they’ll need to see a jump in Year 2.

So there are players Atlanta can build around defensively, but it is this side of the ball -- particularly when it comes to the pass rush, where the Falcons had 21 sacks in 17 games -- that needs the most help. It also needs a new boss, as Dean Pees retired, sending Atlanta looking for a new defensive coordinator.

“Clearly, we want more. We know that’s an area of improvement,” Smith said. “It’s not just because we took two young edge guys that magically, you had Lawrence Taylor Year 1. So, there are a lot of things as we build, strategically, and other pieces that you add along with it, and the development of these young guys.

“That’s how, to me, we need to take another step, but there’s a lot of moving parts to it.”

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