Dental assisting school in Mountain Park, GA

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A Bright Future Lies Ahead

A wise person once said, “The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven’t found it yet, keep looking. Don’t settle.”

At Dental Assisting 101, we believe that everyone deserves a chance to enjoy a career doing what they love. Unfortunately, many men and women in Georgia settle for soulless, thankless jobs with no upward mobility. If you are stuck in a job just to pay the bills, your opportunity to make a change and build a better life is here.

Unlike traditional colleges, we offer our students an expedited pathway to success through a hands-on educational approach where students learn by doing. One of the best ways to secure your future and set yourself up for success is to learn from the best. That’s exactly what you’ll get when you enroll in our dental assisting school in Mountain Park, GA. We pride ourselves on having one of the most effective dental assisting courses in the state, where most students find a position within 60 days of graduation.

When it comes to decisions, choosing a new career path is one of the most important of your life. It’s not an easy choice, and it can be even harder to juggle your current responsibilities while you study and attend class. That is why we offer both in-person and online course structures, focusing on teaching practical skills that you will use every day as a dental assistant. When you choose Assisting 101, you can rest easy knowing you won’t spend valuable time trying to discern complicated lectures or irrelevant tasks. Instead, you will learn crucial skills that will set you apart from your peers and help you begin a new life-changing career in the dental industry.

When you enroll in our dental assisting school, you will reap the benefits of:

  • Flexible schedules for working adults and first-time students
  • Practical training that will teach you the skills necessary to flourish as a dental assistant
  • Knowledgeable dental faculty who want you to succeed
  • Access to your instructor 24-hours a day, 7-days a week
  • Affordable tuition with low payment plan opportunities
  • In-depth career prep to get you ready for a job in the dental industry
  • Resume help and job interview coaching

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Choosing Your Dental Assisting Course In Mountain Park, GA

At Assisting 101, students have their choice of two unique dental assisting programs in Mountain Park. Both programs consist of 78 hours of lecture and 48 hours of in-depth, hands-on training at one of the best dental offices in metro Atlanta. Both programs allow students to build a career in dentistry with the help of real dentists and dental assistants.

STUDENTS CAN CHOOSE FROM TWO DIFFERENT COURSE PROGRAMS: ON-SITE AND ONLINE.

Online Dental Assistant Course

Our online program is ideal for those students that like to complete training at their own pace. If you are an eager student willing to study every day and want to complete this program in as little as one month, you can do so. However, if you would like to take more time to manage other life responsibilities, you have the choice of completing this course in less than six months.

When you choose our online dental assisting course, you will have the opportunity to:

  • Begin classes at any time. With Assisting 101’s online course structure, students may begin learning as soon as their registration is approved.
  • Obtain a customized welcome kit that includes your textbooks, studying materials, alginate impression kits, dentition models, x-ray kit, pouring model package, and scrubs. This way, you can experience hands-on learning from the comfort of your home.
  • Take 10 academic sessions online, totaling 78 hours of lecture time and 30 hours of hands-on training seminars.
  • Immerse yourself in the world of dental assisting, through educational lectures. These lectures contain demonstration videos, slide shows with instructor voice-overs, and rich illustrations to ensure you retain crucial skills and information.
  • Complete the course as quickly as you would like. Dedicated, hardworking students can finish our online dental assisting course in Mountain Park, GA, within a month!
  • Use our externship placement services to help you discover local dental offices in need of interns to help you fulfill our course competencies. While not mandatory for graduation, an externship will help you better prepare for a long career in dentistry. An externship can also be an incredible way to network with industry professionals and work at an office that may hire you down the road.
  • Engage with your instructor, who will be with you every step of the way while you carve your path to a new, rewarding career.

On-Site Dental Assistant Course

Our on-site dental assisting program is perfect for students who do not have to travel long distances to our facility or need to “rush” to complete the course.

THIS PROGRAM IS MORE IN LINE WITH A TRADITIONAL COLLEGE EXPERIENCE AND GIVES STUDENTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO:

  • Immerse yourself in a traditional 10-week-long program consisting of training and in-office lectures each Saturday from 9AM until 5PM. On-site classes are conducted in an intimate teaching environment to ensure each student gets the attention they need and deserve.
  • Learn from successful dental professionals in our state-of-the-art dental assisting school in Mountain Park, GA. Because this program is only offered four times a year, class space is very limited.
  • Get a basic understanding of common dental assisting techniques through lectures in the morning. You will put those techniques to use in our operatories in the afternoon, where you will practice real-world dental assistant duties.
  • Attend an orientation meeting, where you will receive your textbooks, studying materials, scrubs, and more.
  • Benefit from 48 hours of shadowing by our fully trained technicians and dental professionals. While you are being shadowed, your instructor will walk you through important procedures and teach you crucial skills needed for a fulfilling career as a dental assistant.
  • Build friendships and lifelong relationships with like-minded students who also want to begin a career in the dental industry.

Why Choose A Career In The Dental Industry?

According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of dental assistants is expected to grow 11% over the next 10 years – faster than the average job growth of many other industries. New and ongoing evidence suggests an important link between a person’s overall health and their oral health. Because of this, demand for dental-related services is expected to stay strong for years to come. Dental offices in Georgia and other states must meet this projected demand. As such, the need for trained dental assistants will continue to grow.

As Baby Boomers grow older and as more men and women practice good oral hygiene, the need to treat and maintain one’s teeth will lead to an increased need for quality dental care. Over the next decade, the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that nearly 24,000 new dental assisting jobs will be created. That means the future is bright for any student who has been educated through our dental assisting courses in Mountain Park.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT DENTAL ASSISTANT CAREERS OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS

  • Rated #15 Out of 100 Best Health Care Support Jobs According to U.S News and World Report
  • Rated #84 Out of Best 100 Jobs in All of the United States
  • Average Salary: $40,080
  • Unemployment Rate: 2.4%
  • Number of Jobs: 23,400

What Does A Dental Assistant Do?

As a professional dental assistant, you will be tasked with managing a wide range of administrative and clinical responsibilities at a dental office. Dental assistants play a crucial role in the day-to-day workflow involved in a dental practice. They work alongside hygienists and dentists to provide patients with the highest quality oral care in the state of Georgia.

Common dental assistant job duties may include:

  • Assisting in the lab
  • Sterilizing dental equipment and tools
  • Ordering and organizing supplies for their dental office
  • Help perform x-rays
  • Maintain and organize patient dental records
  • Perform coronal polishing for patients
  • Provide fluoride treatments for patients
  • Help educate patients about how to maintain their oral health
  • Help educate patients about best practices relating to proper oral hygiene
  • Providing assistance to dentists and hygienists during cleanings
  • Greet patients and make them feel comfortable
  • Collect important info from new and existing patients
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Why Attend a Dental Assisting School In Mountain Park, GA?

They say the best way to predict the future is to create it, and that is exactly what you will be doing when you enroll at Assisting 101. We believe in getting our students ready for a lifelong career, not just a job that pays the bills. When you attend our award-winning dental assisting school, you are investing in a future rich with opportunity.

Unlike other workers who choose not to attend school for legitimate training, our students enjoy a quick start in a vibrant job market where financial and personal growth are common. When you become a dental assistant after graduation, you will have confidence knowing you are well-prepared for a life-changing career.

HERE ARE SOME OF THE MOST COMMON REASONS WHY OUR STUDENTS SAY THEY CHOOSE TO ATTEND OUR DENTAL ASSISTING SCHOOL:

Happy Career! Happy Life!

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WORK IN AN EVER-GROWING INDUSTRY

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that job growth for dental assistants is growing at a faster rate than most other industries. This bodes well for our students, who will have job security as they navigate the workforce. In a time where many jobs are being replaced by robotics and other technological advances, the skills that you learn at Assisting 101 can help you for the rest of your life.

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FULFILLING BALANCE BETWEEN LIFE AND WORK

The work/life balance in the U.S is a problem. Spending every waking hour at the office instead of home with family can be draining at best and depressing at worst. Unlike other professionals, dental assistants typically enjoy normal working hours during the business week. That means they have more free time to dedicate to their children and families.

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ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

When you are a dental assistant, you plan a crucial role in your dental office. But as an ambassador of the profession, you also help educate patients about the benefits of good oral hygiene. Given the ties between heart health and oral health, you are making more of a difference than you might realize.

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OPPORTUNITY FOR PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

When students graduate from Assisting 101 and accept a job as a dental assistant, many choose to make it their lifelong career. For others, the role of dental assistant is just the beginning – a steppingstone to a role with more responsibility. After only a few years as a dental assistant in Mountain Park, the chance to become a manager or supervisor will become much more likely. The sky is the limit!

Latest News in Mountain Park

Roswell elementary school teaches reading, math and how to use a drill

The Mountain Park Elementary School construction class buzzed with the sounds of nearly 30 children sanding, drilling and hammering.Small hands deftly filed rough edges, clamped wood pieces in place and nailed together napkin holders that their teacher hopes will be the pride of many Thanksgiving feasts to come.Kennedy Martin, 9, concentrated on a crooked nail. She straightened it and started to pound again. This class is one of her favorites at the Roswell school.“I have a grandpa that retired a few years ago, but...

The Mountain Park Elementary School construction class buzzed with the sounds of nearly 30 children sanding, drilling and hammering.

Small hands deftly filed rough edges, clamped wood pieces in place and nailed together napkin holders that their teacher hopes will be the pride of many Thanksgiving feasts to come.

Kennedy Martin, 9, concentrated on a crooked nail. She straightened it and started to pound again. This class is one of her favorites at the Roswell school.

“I have a grandpa that retired a few years ago, but he taught me stuff and I still have managed to learn more,” said the fourth grader.

About 600 students in second through fifth grades are learning the basics of carpentry and construction in a class that officials hope will soon be offered in elementary schools across the state.

Mountain Park’s program is unique in Georgia. Though there are after-school clubs for youngsters, industry experts and some educators want to make construction part of the middle and elementary school day instead of waiting for a teen to wander into a high school shop class.

”We have to do a better job of reaching kids earlier, flat out. High school just ends up being a little too late for a lot of kids,” said Zach Fields of the Construction Education Foundation of Georgia. “Oftentimes we sell students short on what they can actually do.”

CEFGA, a nonprofit that promotes training for skilled trade jobs, serves students in more than 170 school programs. All but a handful are in high schools. Now there’s about 20 middle and elementary schools interested in offering construction, including Hollis Innovation Academy in Atlanta.

The construction organization teamed up with Mountain Park to launch the elementary class for fifth graders last year. This year, it expanded to include even younger grades, and Fulton County Schools provided financial support as part of the district’s investment in career, technology and agricultural education.

Construction is now on the schedule alongside art, music and physical education.

“People were like: ‘You’re going to have second graders using hammers?’ and I’m like ‘Yeah, we are. We are going to teach them how to use hammers,’” said Principal Stacy Perlman.

The class gives students who may not excel in other subjects, such as reading and math, a chance to shine, she said. They’re also learning how to apply the knowledge they learn in other subjects.

In construction teacher Scott Selvig’s classroom, the bulletin boards are covered with numbers: Two-by-four lumber and 80-grit sandpaper.

He started the year by showing students how to safely use the equipment stored neatly in drawers and cabinets. One of their first projects — an oversized wooden domino — required 13 different tools.

When the fifth graders made tool boxes, they also wrote and illustrated instruction manuals. (“I drilled a hole for a handle,” read one page. “I cut a angle at 45 degrees.”)

Selvig modified some tasks. When it’s time to drill a hole, students use a nail instead of a drill bit because it’s cheaper to replace a broken nail.

And he’s a stickler for a job well done, which likely means more sanding.

“When are we ready?” he asked students during a recent class. “When everything is…?”

“Smooth!” the children responded in unison.

Arlo Irving, 9, said his favorite thing about the class is that he gets to build his “own things and bring it home” instead of buying it online.

“It’s more fun than just waiting for it to come in like five days,” he said.

His fourth grade classmate Cannon Oaks, 9, said he has many of the same tools at home and thinks he may try making projects on his own.

“I think I’ll be able to do this sometime when I have a little more experience,” he said.

One challenge to expanding the construction programs into elementary schools is paying for it. A federal funding source for career and technical education can only be used for fifth through 12th grades. That means state funding would be required for younger classes, said Meghan Frick, a spokeswoman for the Georgia Department of Education.

By the time some students reach high school, they’re disconnected from learning or have already decided what they are interested in, said Fields. CEFGA is betting that if younger children get a chance to create, they’ll be more likely to consider a career in construction.

“They’re using power tools for the very first time. They’re driving their very first nail, and it’s super special,” Fields said.

Getting your ice and snow fix in and around Atlanta

The weather outside is frightful. Well, maybe not, since this is Georgia after all. But that doesn’t give you an excuse to sit on the couch watching Hallmark movies until the Braves poke their heads out of the dugout and declare that spring is here.So, put on a sweater, gloves and hat (a pom pom on top gets extra points), go outside, enjoy the crisp air and do a few laps around an ice rink or maybe go tubing. Yes, there are places for winter activities in metro Atlanta that are perfect for snow bunnies of all ages.While t...

The weather outside is frightful. Well, maybe not, since this is Georgia after all. But that doesn’t give you an excuse to sit on the couch watching Hallmark movies until the Braves poke their heads out of the dugout and declare that spring is here.

So, put on a sweater, gloves and hat (a pom pom on top gets extra points), go outside, enjoy the crisp air and do a few laps around an ice rink or maybe go tubing. Yes, there are places for winter activities in metro Atlanta that are perfect for snow bunnies of all ages.

While the area has year-round rinks, several more rinks pop up during the winter season. Many mixed-use complexes have discovered that ice skating is a perfect activity for families, teens and date nights. Colony Square used to have an indoor rink back in the 1970s, and then turned the space into a food court. Today, after undergoing a $400 million redevelopment plan, the rink is back — and it’s outdoors.

“There is a lot of history with Colony Square and ice skating. [Olympic champion] JoJo Starbuck used to practice here. What’s old is new again,” says Lauren Ness, marketing manager. “In Georgia we don’t get the weather where you can skate on a pond so people can come out here and skate outdoors. It puts you in the festive spirit.” Next to the rink is a 62-foot tree adding to the joyful mood.

“It’s been real good,” she says. “The teens are coming after school and we’re seeing more date nights and couples coming to dinner, skating and then having a drink.”

Park Tavern has had an ice skating rink under a tent overlooking Piedmont Park for 11 years. The 85-feet long and 40-feet wide rink has found favor with a wide audience. “Everyone gets the joy of skating,” says Paul Smith, who with his wife Angela, has owned Park Tavern for 25 years. “We get a lot of smaller children, and for the younger people, it’s the experience of learning something new and then getting good at it. That’s the challenge. Ice skating can be difficult at first and then it becomes second nature.”

The core group of skaters are in their 20s but Smith said there are more than a few who collect Social Security practicing their spins and double axels. Adding to the festivities is that the restaurant has two fire pits, three fireplaces and several holiday drink specials.

This is the second year that the rink’s theme is “A Miracle on 10th Street” featuring an abundance of festive and kitschy decor, complete with 10 distinct decorated areas for taking holiday selfies with friends.

The Rooftop at Ponce features a 3,500-square foot ice skating rink, where skaters can enjoy 50 minutes on the ice as well as unlimited gameplay at Skyline Park. Skaters will enjoy one of the city’s best skyline views as they whirl around the rink.

East of Atlanta, there are two family-owned outdoor rinks, called Ice Days Covington and Ice Days at Olde Town Conyers. The rink in Conyers opened about 23 years ago and Jim Gomez took it over nine years ago. “It’s become a holiday stable in Olde Town Conyers,” he says. “You see the same families coming and watching the kids grow up. It’s a holiday tradition.” The rink in Covington opened five years ago.

“I’m from California and I never skated on an outdoor rink, but I played hockey. Ice skating and hockey were two of my favorite things growing up,” he says. “I never was on an outdoor pond like so many of the Northeastern transplants. We get a lot of comments from people saying they never thought they’d skate outdoors again. Skating outdoors is fun and a unique experience that you can’t get elsewhere.”

For youngsters who don’t want to lace up the skates, head over to the Fernbank Museum for the Sock Skating Ring. Children wear only socks as they slide around the slippery “ice”. An inside tip is that fuzzy polyester socks yield the best slide while cotton socks are the least slippery.

For the second year now, Stone Mountain Park cancelled its Snow Christmas but Margaritaville Resorts at Lanier Islands has a variety of winter fun including snow tubing on Blizzard Mountain, featuring one of North America’s longest snow rides down a 575-foot-long, 8-story snow slide. In addition to ice skating, Snowball Alley offers the opportunity to have a good old-fashioned snowball fight or to make snow angels in the show.

Here are a few of the outdoor places to get a winter buzz.

Holiday rinks

Avalon on Ice. 3-10 p.m. Monday-Friday; 10 a.m.-10 p.m. Saturday and holidays; noon-7 p.m. Sunday. $18 (includes skates); age 9 and younger, $14. Reservations suggested. 400 Avalon Blvd., Alpharetta. 770-765-2000, experienceavalon.com.

The Rink Powered by Pepsi at Park Tavern. 4:30-8 p.m. Monday-Friday; 11:30 a.m.-8 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. 8:30 p.m.-midnight (ages 16 and up) Sunday-Saturday. $15 Monday-Thursday; $20 Friday, Saturday, Sunday. 500 10th St. NE, Atlanta. 404-249-0001, parktavern.com/ice-rink.

The Roof at Ponce City Market. 3-10 p.m. Monday-Wednesday; 3 p.m.-midnight Friday; 11 a.m.-midnight Saturday; 11 a.m.-10 p.m. Sunday. $15, plus admission to The Roof, for 50 minutes of skating, skate rentals and unlimited gameplay at Skyline Park. 675 Ponce de Leon Ave., Atlanta. 770-999-1530, poncecityroof.com.

Sock Skating Rink. Fernbank Museum. 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Free with general admission ($18-$20). 767 Clifton Road, Atlanta. 404-929-6300, fernbankmuseum.org.

Skate the Station. Atlantic Station. 4-10 p.m. Monday-Friday; 11 a.m.-11 p.m. Saturday; Noon-8 p.m. Sunday; $15 (includes skate rental); season pass $60. 1380 Atlantic Drive NW, Atlanta. 404-410-4010, atlanticstation.com.

Olde Town on Ice. $13 (includes skates). Various times. 949 S. Main St., Conyers. 678-374-7655, icedays.com.

Ice Days at Legion Field. $13 (includes skates). Various times. 3173 Mill St, Covington. 678-374-7655, icedays.com.

Have an Ice Day. Various hours. $10; $8, age 8 and younger. $4 skate rental. 5039 W. Broad St., Sugar Hill, 770-554-7506, haidrink.com.

Rinks open all year

Atlanta Ice House. 6 a.m.-11 p.m., Monday-Sunday. $11; $8 under age 10 and military; $4 skate rental. 2600 Prado Lane, Marietta. 404-800-2150, atlantaicehouse.com.

The Ice. 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. and 4:30-6:30 p.m. Friday; 1:30-3:30 p.m. Saturday-Sunday. Two-hour public skate: age 3-5 years, $5; age 6-10, $7; age 11 and older, $9; age 55 and older (includes skate rental), $11. Skate rental, $4. 1345 Atlanta Highway, Cumming. 678-845-0103, theice.info.

Center Ice Arena. Various times. $10; age 5 and under, $7; age 3 and younger free. Skate rental, $5. 5750 Roswell Road, Sandy Springs. 404-549-8425, centericearena.org.

Atlanta IceForum. Various times. $12; age 5 and younger, $6. Skate rental, $6. 2300 Satellite Blvd., Duluth. 770-813-1010, iceforum.com.

The Cooler. 11 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Monday and Wednesday; 11 a.m.-12:45 p.m. and 3:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m. Tuesday and Thursday; 10:15 a.m.-12:15 p.m., 3:30 p.m.-5:30 p.m. and 8:15 p.m.-10:15 p.m. Friday; 1 p.m.-3 p.m., 3:15 p.m.-5:15 p.m., 8:15 p.m.-10:15 p.m. Saturday; 2 p.m.-5 p.m., Sunday. $10 (doesn’t include skates). 10800 Davis Drive, Alpharetta. 770-649-6600, coolerathletics.com.

Snow Fun

License to Chill Snow Island. Margaritaville at Lanier Islands. Various hours. Starts at $34.99. 7650 Lanier Islands Parkway, Buford. 470-323-3440, mararitavillaresorts.com/margaritaville-at-lanier-islands.com.

Park Springs life plan community welcomes new Healthcare administrator Ronald Gooden in Stone Mountain

Park Springs has named Ronald Gooden as healthcare administrator of the resort-style life plan community offering best-in-class independent living, assisted living, memory care and Medicare-certified skilled nursing on a beautiful 61-acre campus in Stone Mountain.As such, he will be responsible for daily operations of the skilled nursing facility at the community’s Pebblebrook healthcare facility, including managing the patient care experience for members and their families, ensuring compliance with medical and legal regulations...

Park Springs has named Ronald Gooden as healthcare administrator of the resort-style life plan community offering best-in-class independent living, assisted living, memory care and Medicare-certified skilled nursing on a beautiful 61-acre campus in Stone Mountain.

As such, he will be responsible for daily operations of the skilled nursing facility at the community’s Pebblebrook healthcare facility, including managing the patient care experience for members and their families, ensuring compliance with medical and legal regulations as well as internal policies and procedures, and managing health records.

“Ron’s previous experience and his passion to improve the quality of life of our seniors aligns perfectly with his role of healthcare administrator,” said Andy Isakson, founder and managing partner at Isakson Living which developed and operates Park Springs.

“His leadership is already evident in the short time he has been with us, and we are thrilled to see what he accomplishes at Pebblebrook.”

Park Springs, practices the household model of relationship-based care in the community’s assisted living, memory care and skilled nursing households.

The emphasis is on caring for the needs of the whole person, not just clinical care.

Households are designed to provide both lifestyle and supportive services, including social programming, health services and a healthy diet prepared by personal chefs.

A dedicated health services team supports the households including physical therapists, occupational therapists, speech therapists and a full-time in-house doctor specializing in geriatric medicine.

“The relationship-based household model of care that is at the heart of Pebblebrook’s operations provides a solid foundation to ensure the highest level of care to our members,” said Gooden.

“The dedication of the Park Springs staff to our members was evident from the day that I arrived, and I look forward to collaborating with the team to constantly improve upon the care and daily interactions with our members and their families.”

Gooden brings a wealth of experience leading teams at senior healthcare facilities throughout the Southeast, including recently directing the daily operations for day-to-day operation of a 163-bed facility with over 90 associates involving Medicare and Medicaid regulations.

He received a bachelor of science in healthcare management from Florida A&M University and an MBA in finance from Strayer University.

He is a licensed nursing home administrator in both Georgia and North Carolina. Gooden lives in Lithonia and enjoys spending time with family and friends.

In his spare time, he participates in golf, fishing, white water rafting and numerous other sports.

Andrew Bird and Iron & Wine Announce 2022 Outside Problems Co-Headlining Tour

Acclaimed songwriters and performers Andrew Bird and Iron & Wine have announced a co-headlining tour for summer 2022, which will span from June to August.“It will have been more than two years of being grounded when we finally embark on the ‘Outside Problems’ summer tour. 90% outdoor venues,” said Bird of the tour. “A fine road companion in Iron & Wine. I only wish it could happen sooner. I’m not sure why it took so long for me to meet Sam Beam. His music I have known and admired for many ye...

Acclaimed songwriters and performers Andrew Bird and Iron & Wine have announced a co-headlining tour for summer 2022, which will span from June to August.

“It will have been more than two years of being grounded when we finally embark on the ‘Outside Problems’ summer tour. 90% outdoor venues,” said Bird of the tour. “A fine road companion in Iron & Wine. I only wish it could happen sooner. I’m not sure why it took so long for me to meet Sam Beam. His music I have known and admired for many years now. What a lovely guy. The kind of guy that would help you move. See you on the outside.”

“Really looking forward to sharing the night with Andrew Bird for the Outside Problems Tour—our relationship started outside in Yosemite and bringing that into 2022 is exciting,” added Iron & Wine frontman Sam Beam. “And I’m happy to help Andrew move, but I might try to talk him into just staying put first!”

The tour, though, isn’t the first collaboration of late for the two artists. Earlier this year, Bird and Beam performed from Tenaya Lake and Cathedral Beach in California’s Yosemite National Park, demonstrating the power of both music and nature.

The performances were sponsored by Lucky Brand with media company La Blogothèque, which includes a $25,000 donation to the National Parks and contests for fans for Taylor guitars and other gifts that will benefit the outdoors.

“As a performer, reacting to my environment has been a constant driver,” said Bird in a statement. “From my Echolocations series to Gezelligheid concerts to Play for the Parks, the idea is simple: be flexible and wait for your environment to tell you what it wants to hear. With Sam Beam and Yosemite as collaborators, this was an ideal environment.”

“No photograph can prepare a person for the scale and beauty of Yosemite,” said Beam. “It was my first visit and I was completely overwhelmed. What a blessing to be able to spend it making music with Andrew Bird—and ankle deep in water to boot!”

See Beam with Bird perform “Upward Over the Mountain” below.

Tickets for the tour go on sale Friday (Dec. 17). See the full list of dates, many of which are outdoors, below.

Andrew Bird and Iron & Wine – 2022 Tour Dates

6/12 – Phoenix, AZ – The Van Buren

6/13 – San Diego, CA – The Magnolia

6/15 – Los Angeles, CA – Greek Theatre

6/17 – Berkeley, CA – Greek Theatre

6/18 – Portland, OR – TBA

6/19 – Seattle, WA – TBA

6/21 – Salt Lake City, UT – TBA

6/22 – Morrison, CO – Red Rocks Amphitheatre*

7/22 – Atlanta, GA – Pullman Yards

7/23 – Asheville, NC – Rabbit Rabbit

7/24 – Nashville, TN – Ryman Auditorium

7/25 – Cary, NC – Koka Booth

7/27 – Charlottesville, VA – Ting Pavilion

7/28 – Vienna, VA – TBA

7/29 – New York, NY – Pier 17

7/30 – New Haven, CT – Westville Bowl

7/31 – Bethlehem, PA – Steel Stacks

8/02 – Lafayette, NY – Beak & Skiff

8/04 – Cincinnati, OH – PNC Pavilion at Riverbend

8/05 – Grand Rapids, MI – TBA

8/06 – Indianapolis, IN – TCU Amphitheater

8/08 – Pittsburgh, PA – Stage AE

8/09 – Columbus, OH – Express Live!

8/10 – St Louis, MO – Chesterfield Amphitheater

8/12 – Chicago, IL – TBA

8/13 – Minneapolis, MN – Surly

Photos courtesy Shore Fire Media

Stone Mountain Park board approves truth-telling exhibit, moving flags

The Stone Mountain Memorial Association board on Monday approved a handful of resolutions that it hopes will help soften the image of the world’s largest Confederate monument — and, perhaps, get the park out of a looming economic bind.The adopted resolutions included giving the go-ahead for a new on-site museum exhibit that officials say would aim to ...

The Stone Mountain Memorial Association board on Monday approved a handful of resolutions that it hopes will help soften the image of the world’s largest Confederate monument — and, perhaps, get the park out of a looming economic bind.

The adopted resolutions included giving the go-ahead for a new on-site museum exhibit that officials say would aim to “tell the truth” about the ugly history of the park and the mountainside carving of Confederate leaders Jefferson Davis, Stonewall Jackson and Robert E. Lee.

The board also approved relocating a Confederate flag plaza from the mountain’s walk-up trail. The flags, which were erected in the 1960s by the United Daughters of the Confederacy, would be moved to Valor Park — an area near the base of the mountain that already hosts a number of other tributes to the Civil War South.

Georgia law prohibits the flags from being removed entirely, but officials said the move would keep them off the park’s most heavily trafficked area.

The logo for the Stone Mountain Memorial Association itself, which currently including a rendering of the carving, will change as well.

“We’re just taking our first step today, to get where we need to go,” said Rev. Abraham Mosley, who became the memorial association’s first Black board chairman when he was appointed last month.

Memorial association CEO Bill Stephens called the changes the “most dramatic move forward” since the park opened in the ‘60s. That’s likely true, and the fact that they were even on the table marks a significant shift in the memorial association’s approach to the mountain.

But activists who have spent years calling for a reckoning at Stone Mountain hope there’s a lot more to come.

The changes approved Monday do not include renaming streets in the park that bear the names of Confederate leaders or altering or removing the carving itself, which many activists have pushed for.

“We want you to take what you have, clean it up, and let’s move on,” former DeKalb NAACP chairman John Evans said, calling for the carving to be removed and street names changed. “We’re just not gonna accept anything less than that.”

Other initiatives previously pitched by Stephens — including renaming the park’s Confederate Hall building — were not addressed during Monday’s meeting but aren’t being abandoned, Stephens said.

Under the resolution adopted Monday, the chair and vice chair of the memorial association board would appoint seven members to an advisory committee that will help shape the new museum exhibit contextualizing the carving.

Stephens said he envisions a committee of community leaders, local residents and historians. The adopted resolution anticipates it would be active for one year, starting July 1.

“We want to have the makeup of the community involved with those seven that we select,” said Mosley.

The carving was started in the Jim Crow era and, like other Confederate monuments from that time, was intended to glorify white supremacy, historians recently told the AJC. Members of the second Ku Klux Klan, which was reborn on Stone Mountain in 1915, also had a role in the carving’s conception.

Foiled by financial issues and personal spats, the carving was abandoned in late 1920s. Work didn’t resume until after the state of Georgia bought the mountain in 1958.

Historians said the purchase was largely a reaction to federally mandated school integration and the Civil Rights movement.

The mostly completed carving was dedicated in 1970, more than a century after the end of the Civil War.

“We’re gonna tell that story,” Stephens said.

Dennis Collard is a co-founder of the Stone Mountain Action Coalition, a grassroots group that has called for change at the park since its formation last summer.

“It is time to stop pretending that this place is about heritage,” he said.

Financial concerns

Officials admit the changes currently being considered at the park are largely driven by financial concerns.

Marriott purportedly plans to pull out of operating the park’s primary hotel and convention center. And Herschend Family Entertainment, which has operated the park’s revenue-generating attractions since they were privatized in 1998, plans to leave next summer.

Herschend, a Norcross-based company, cited both COVID-19 and frequent clashes between Confederate groups, far right extremists and counter-protesters as reasons for ending their partnership with the park.

Stephens said he has spoken with several companies about taking over Herschend’s role and all said that “the Confederacy issue” needs to be addressed before they would consider doing so.

“I think these were necessary steps to be able to say to people who would do business with us, that we want to tell the truth, tell the whole story,” Stephens said Monday. “We’re limited on what we can do and can’t do, but we’re gonna take action where we can. And I hope it makes a difference.”

WHAT THE STONE MOUNTAIN MEMORIAL ASSOCIATION VOTED ON

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