Dental assisting school in Roswell, GA

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A Bright Future Lies Ahead

A wise person once said, "The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle."

At Dental Assisting 101, we believe that everyone deserves a chance to enjoy a career doing what they love. Unfortunately, many men and women in Georgia settle for soulless, thankless jobs with no upward mobility. If you are stuck in a job just to pay the bills, your opportunity to make a change and build a better life is here.

Unlike traditional colleges, we offer our students an expedited pathway to success through a hands-on educational approach where students learn by doing. One of the best ways to secure your future and set yourself up for success is to learn from the best. That's exactly what you'll get when you enroll in our dental assisting school in Roswell, GA. We pride ourselves on having one of the most effective dental assisting courses in the state, where most students find a position within 60 days of graduation.

When it comes to decisions, choosing a new career path is one of the most important of your life. It's not an easy choice, and it can be even harder to juggle your current responsibilities while you study and attend class. That is why we offer both in-person and online course structures, focusing on teaching practical skills that you will use every day as a dental assistant. When you choose Assisting 101, you can rest easy knowing you won't spend valuable time trying to discern complicated lectures or irrelevant tasks. Instead, you will learn crucial skills that will set you apart from your peers and help you begin a new life-changing career in the dental industry.

When you enroll in our dental assisting school, you will reap the benefits of:

  • Flexible schedules for working adults and first-time students
  • Practical training that will teach you the skills necessary to flourish as a dental assistant
  • Knowledgeable dental faculty who want you to succeed
  • Access to your instructor 24-hours a day, 7-days a week
  • Affordable tuition with low payment plan opportunities
  • In-depth career prep to get you ready for a job in the dental industry
  • Resume help and job interview coaching

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Dental Assistant School Roswell, GA
 Dental Assistant Course Roswell, GA

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Choosing Your Dental Assisting Course In Roswell, GA

At Assisting 101, students have their choice of two unique dental assisting programs in Roswell. Both programs consist of 78 hours of lecture and 48 hours of in-depth, hands-on training at one of the best dental offices in metro Atlanta. Both programs allow students to build a career in dentistry with the help of real dentists and dental assistants.

STUDENTS CAN CHOOSE FROM TWO DIFFERENT COURSE PROGRAMS: ON-SITE AND ONLINE.

Online Dental Assistant Course

Our online program is ideal for those students that like to complete training at their own pace. If you are an eager student willing to study every day and want to complete this program in as little as one month, you can do so. However, if you would like to take more time to manage other life responsibilities, you have the choice of completing this course in less than six months.

When you choose our online dental assisting course, you will have the opportunity to:

  • Begin classes at any time. With Assisting 101's online course structure, students may begin learning as soon as their registration is approved.
  • Obtain a customized welcome kit that includes your textbooks, studying materials, alginate impression kits, dentition models, x-ray kit, pouring model package, and scrubs. This way, you can experience hands-on learning from the comfort of your home.
  • Take 10 academic sessions online, totaling 78 hours of lecture time and 30 hours of hands-on training seminars.
  • Immerse yourself in the world of dental assisting, through educational lectures. These lectures contain demonstration videos, slide shows with instructor voice-overs, and rich illustrations to ensure you retain crucial skills and information.
  • Complete the course as quickly as you would like. Dedicated, hardworking students can finish our online dental assisting course in Roswell, GA, within a month!
  • Use our externship placement services to help you discover local dental offices in need of interns to help you fulfill our course competencies. While not mandatory for graduation, an externship will help you better prepare for a long career in dentistry. An externship can also be an incredible way to network with industry professionals and work at an office that may hire you down the road.
  • Engage with your instructor, who will be with you every step of the way while you carve your path to a new, rewarding career.

On-Site Dental Assistant Course

Our on-site dental assisting program is perfect for students who do not have to travel long distances to our facility or need to "rush" to complete the course.

THIS PROGRAM IS MORE IN LINE WITH A TRADITIONAL COLLEGE EXPERIENCE AND GIVES STUDENTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO:

  • Immerse yourself in a traditional 10-week-long program consisting of training and in-office lectures each Saturday from 9AM until 5PM. On-site classes are conducted in an intimate teaching environment to ensure each student gets the attention they need and deserve.
  • Learn from successful dental professionals in our state-of-the-art dental assisting school in Roswell, GA. Because this program is only offered four times a year, class space is very limited.
  • Get a basic understanding of common dental assisting techniques through lectures in the morning. You will put those techniques to use in our operatories in the afternoon, where you will practice real-world dental assistant duties.
  • Attend an orientation meeting, where you will receive your textbooks, studying materials, scrubs, and more.
  • Benefit from 48 hours of shadowing by our fully trained technicians and dental professionals. While you are being shadowed, your instructor will walk you through important procedures and teach you crucial skills needed for a fulfilling career as a dental assistant.
  • Build friendships and lifelong relationships with like-minded students who also want to begin a career in the dental industry.

Why Choose A Career In The Dental Industry?

According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of dental assistants is expected to grow 11% over the next 10 years - faster than the average job growth of many other industries. New and ongoing evidence suggests an important link between a person's overall health and their oral health. Because of this, demand for dental-related services is expected to stay strong for years to come. Dental offices in Georgia and other states must meet this projected demand. As such, the need for trained dental assistants will continue to grow.

As Baby Boomers grow older and as more men and women practice good oral hygiene, the need to treat and maintain one's teeth will lead to an increased need for quality dental care. Over the next decade, the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that nearly 24,000 new dental assisting jobs will be created. That means the future is bright for any student who has been educated through our dental assisting courses in Roswell.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT DENTAL ASSISTANT CAREERS OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS

  • Rated #15 Out of 100 Best Health Care Support Jobs According to U.S News and World Report
  • Rated #84 Out of Best 100 Jobs in All of the United States
  • Average Salary: $40,080
  • Unemployment Rate: 2.4%
  • Number of Jobs: 23,400

What Does A Dental Assistant Do?

As a professional dental assistant, you will be tasked with managing a wide range of administrative and clinical responsibilities at a dental office. Dental assistants play a crucial role in the day-to-day workflow involved in a dental practice. They work alongside hygienists and dentists to provide patients with the highest quality oral care in the state of Georgia.

Common dental assistant job duties may include:

  • Assisting in the lab
  • Sterilizing dental equipment and tools
  • Ordering and organizing supplies for their dental office
  • Help perform x-rays
  • Maintain and organize patient dental records
  • Perform coronal polishing for patients
  • Provide fluoride treatments for patients
  • Help educate patients about how to maintain their oral health
  • Help educate patients about best practices relating to proper oral hygiene
  • Providing assistance to dentists and hygienists during cleanings
  • Greet patients and make them feel comfortable
  • Collect important info from new and existing patients
 Dental Assistant Classes Roswell, GA

Why Attend a Dental Assisting School In Roswell, GA?

They say the best way to predict the future is to create it, and that is exactly what you will be doing when you enroll at Assisting 101. We believe in getting our students ready for a lifelong career, not just a job that pays the bills. When you attend our award-winning dental assisting school, you are investing in a future rich with opportunity.

Unlike other workers who choose not to attend school for legitimate training, our students enjoy a quick start in a vibrant job market where financial and personal growth are common. When you become a dental assistant after graduation, you will have confidence knowing you are well-prepared for a life-changing career.

HERE ARE SOME OF THE MOST COMMON REASONS WHY OUR STUDENTS SAY THEY CHOOSE TO ATTEND OUR DENTAL ASSISTING SCHOOL:

Happy Career! Happy Life!

Dental Assistant School Roswell, GA

WORK IN AN EVER-GROWING INDUSTRY

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that job growth for dental assistants is growing at a faster rate than most other industries. This bodes well for our students, who will have job security as they navigate the workforce. In a time where many jobs are being replaced by robotics and other technological advances, the skills that you learn at Assisting 101 can help you for the rest of your life.

 Dental Assistant Course Roswell, GA

FULFILLING BALANCE BETWEEN LIFE AND WORK

The work/life balance in the U.S is a problem. Spending every waking hour at the office instead of home with family can be draining at best and depressing at worst. Unlike other professionals, dental assistants typically enjoy normal working hours during the business week. That means they have more free time to dedicate to their children and families.

 Dental Assistant Program Roswell, GA

ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

When you are a dental assistant, you plan a crucial role in your dental office. But as an ambassador of the profession, you also help educate patients about the benefits of good oral hygiene. Given the ties between heart health and oral health, you are making more of a difference than you might realize.

 Dental Assistant Roswell, GA

OPPORTUNITY FOR PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

When students graduate from Assisting 101 and accept a job as a dental assistant, many choose to make it their lifelong career. For others, the role of dental assistant is just the beginning - a steppingstone to a role with more responsibility. After only a few years as a dental assistant in Roswell, the chance to become a manager or supervisor will become much more likely. The sky is the limit!

Latest News in Roswell, GA

Mother's Day 2022 Gifts: What Do Roswell Moms Really Want?

Check out these Roswell gift shops, spas and florists in time for Mother's Day this year.ROSWELL, GA — What do Roswell moms want from their kids this Mother's Day?What many will likely get come May 8 are jewelry and Mother's Day brunch or dinner out. Those two categories are driving a record ...

Check out these Roswell gift shops, spas and florists in time for Mother's Day this year.

ROSWELL, GA — What do Roswell moms want from their kids this Mother's Day?

What many will likely get come May 8 are jewelry and Mother's Day brunch or dinner out. Those two categories are driving a record $31.7 billion in Mother's Day spending, a $3.6 billion increase over last year's record, according to a report last week from the National Retail Federation and Prosper Insight & Analytics.

Some 84 percent of U.S. adults said they plan to celebrate Mother's Day with a gift, spending $245 on average on their mothers and mother figures, the report said. Jewelry stores alone are expected to see $7 billion in spending, according to the report.

That's good news for jewelry and keepsake shops around Roswell.

If you're planning to treat Mom to dinner out, reservations are going quickly at restaurants in Roswell, including those OpenTable recently listed among the 100 Best Brunch Spots in America. Reservations are up 39 percent from pre-pandemic 2019, and up 13 percent from 2021, the online reservation service said last week.

And, according to the OpenTable survey, almost half (48 percent) of moms want to celebrate Mother's Day at a restaurant. The survey of 1,255 adults also showed that 45 percent plan to make up for lost time with their mother figures during the pandemic by "going big" this year.

A 2021 YouGov poll revealed the top five gifts moms want are flowers, a card with a heartfelt message, a gift certificate to the spa or for a massage, jewelry and chocolate. Most moms are satisfied with however their children honor them on Mother's Day, though, with 58 percent saying they've never been disappointed by their kids' shows of affection and appreciation.

Some reliable go-to places for gifts in Roswell include

We took our own informal survey of several Patch moms. While by no means scientific, it revealed some similar themes.

"We have always had the girls make homemade cards — even now that they are teenagers," one mom told us, adding the handwritten notes are "so much more meaningful than any Hallmark card could ever be."

Some new moms and those with small children don't want stuff as much as they do a break.

"New moms can't expect to get anything from the kids," one Patch mom told us. "I'd say a restaurant gift certificate for them. That's one less meal to cook."

Another said: "My toddler keeps me running around all the time and doesn't sleep, so any time I can have to take care of myself, anything to feel pampered even just for an hour — mani/pedi, hair blown out, restaurant gift card so I don't have to cook, or just an offer to watch him for one hour."

It never hurts to drop a hint.

"I want a plant — not flowers, because they don't last as long — but a plant that my husband knows I have a spot for and the right light for," one mom told us. Another said, "you can never go wrong with a bottle of wine."

And another Patch mom treats herself to a hike on Mother's Day. "The kids usually join in," she said, "even if they don't want to."

Said another: "Alone time! Night at a hotel. Dinner date or night out with friends. Meals pre-ordered and handled."

Precious ones, we have news for you: Each of you is going to give your mom 45 pieces of homemade artwork between now and when you leave the nest, according to a survey last year conducted by OnePoll for the art website Canvaspop. And while your moms may say they'll treasure your creative expressions as if Picasso himself were responsible — and, in fact, three-fourths of them display some of it on their walls — another fact is 41 percent agree you're "no Picasso."

So, change that up, kiddos.

More than two-thirds of moms last year said they want more family photos for their walls, but with a catch: Give mom a break from behind the shutter and take photos that include her. The average mom surveyed said she's featured in less than half of family photos.

This survey was in 2021, but unless you wore out the shutter on your camera taking photos, the advice holds.

With inflation at a 40-year high, money is tight for many Smyrna families. Experiences count a lot with moms, and they don't have to break the budget.

"I don't need stuff," a Patch mom with an adult child told us. She just wants to spend quality time with her daughter.

"A mom's view of Mother's Day changes as kids get older," another Patch mom said. "When they were little, homemade cards and a Mother's Day spa getaway from them was pure bliss. Now the perfect Mother's Day for me involves dressing up, going out to dinner, and listening to all of their laughter and stories."

But, she said, "I still love the homemade cards and have saved them all through the years!"

Here's another idea: Pick up a nice, cloth-covered journal and write down some of your favorite memories of Mom. Be sure to include some of the bits of advice she's dished out over the years. And don't forget to tell her she was right.

Or how about a scavenger hunt for some of Mom's favorite things? That idea comes from Woman's Day. Or how about a custom jigsaw puzzle of a cherished family photo featuring Mom front and center? (This assumes you've followed the advice above and gotten Mom out from behind the shutter.)

What is your idea of a perfect Mother's Day gift? Tell us in the comments.

Why Termite Inspections In The Roswell Area Are Worth Every Penny

An ounce of prevention can save you lots of money in the long run and keep your home safe from damage.Every year, termites cause billions of dollars of structural damage, and property owners spend over $2 billion treating these destructive pests. Preventing an infestation can save you hundreds to thousands of dollars out of your own pocket since ...

An ounce of prevention can save you lots of money in the long run and keep your home safe from damage.

Every year, termites cause billions of dollars of structural damage, and property owners spend over $2 billion treating these destructive pests. Preventing an infestation can save you hundreds to thousands of dollars out of your own pocket since many insurance companies will not cover termite damage. The destruction can be extensive, requiring repairs to structural beams, windows and even interior wall framing, which is why it's vital to have a professional termite inspector visit your home annually.

Fortunately, Thumbtack — a convenient home services app used by millions — makes it easier than ever to find top-rated termite inspectors in the Roswell area. Each pro on Thumbtack has their own profile with price information, allowing you to find a termite inspector who works within your budget.

While the cost for inspection will vary depending on various factors — such as your home's size, if there are hard-to-reach areas and whether you have additional outbuildings to inspect — the average fixed cost for a termite inspection in the greater Atlanta-Sandy Springs-Roswell, GA region is $118, according to data obtained by Thumbtack.

Clearly, the cost of an annual termite inspection is a small price to pay when you consider just how costly the damage of an untreated infestation can be. Here are some top-rated termite inspectors in the Roswell area.

After your termite inspection is complete, you can use Thumbtack to connect with other pros in the Roswell area to complete nearly any job on your list. You can hire a house cleaner, landscaper, plumber, HVAC technician and just about any other professional who is ready to help you knock out your home maintenance tasks. Thumbtack pros even have reviews, so you know exactly what other Roswell community members thought of their services.

Need to hire a professional termite inspection service in the Roswell area? Let the pros at Thumbtack help you get the job done!

Pricing data is based on projects requested on Thumbtack in the past 24 months as reported directly by the independent service professional or individual consumer.

Roswell’s new mayor apologizes for angry email

Roswell’s new mayor says he was wrong for sending an angry email to the city administrator just weeks after election day in November.Mayor Kurt Wilson took the oath of office in City Hall chambers earlier this week and will lead his first City Council meeting on Monday.After beating former Mayor Lori Henry and resident Jason Yowell in the November election, he has vowed to take ownership of derailed city projects such as the realignment of Oxbo Road, and to also put residents’ interests first.But he’s o...

Roswell’s new mayor says he was wrong for sending an angry email to the city administrator just weeks after election day in November.

Mayor Kurt Wilson took the oath of office in City Hall chambers earlier this week and will lead his first City Council meeting on Monday.

After beating former Mayor Lori Henry and resident Jason Yowell in the November election, he has vowed to take ownership of derailed city projects such as the realignment of Oxbo Road, and to also put residents’ interests first.

But he’s off to a rocky start.

Emails obtained by the AJC show Randy Knighton contacted Wilson Nov. 23 about a detailed orientation program he was arranging for newly elected officials, and wanted to coordinate with him. In his reply, Wilson took issue with Knighton waiting three weeks after the Nov. 2 election to contact him, calling it “unacceptable,” and questioned the city administrator’s ability to do his job.

“I would like to know if this is a job you are really going to be able to execute at a high level for the city of Roswell and this incoming city council and mayor?” Wilson wrote.

The AJC held a video conference call together with Wilson and Knighton Thursday in which the mayor said he was wrong and wants to reset.

Wilson said he wrote the email out of frustration and not receiving a call or note from Henry following the election.

“I was frustrated knowing a transition needed to take place,” he said. “I was wrong. It was a bad email on my part. It was poorly written. It was a poor response ... When I’m wrong, I’m wrong.”

Social media reaction to Wilson’s email, along with messages to the AJC from residents, range from “concerned” to “appalled,” and describe the content of the mayor’s note as “bullying.”

After posting the emails on its Facebook page Tuesday, Roswell Truth received nearly 60 comments. Wilson said he, too, has received text messages about his email.

“What concerned me the most is that he is treating this man as his inferior,” Resident Bo Turchin said via email to the AJC. “He isn’t even in office, and telling another human being that he is incompetent for not congratulating him quick enough.”

During the Thursday video conference with the AJC, Wilson sat with Knighton in a City Hall boardroom and apologized to the city administrator, adding that he hadn’t done so before that time.

Similar to Wilson, Knighton is also new to his Roswell position. He was hired after a split City Council vote approving his employment in September. Opposing council members said they wanted the hire delayed until after the election.

Wilson said he has told Knighton that he wished the city manager had waited until after the election to accept the position, but he supports him.

“There is no predisposed thoughts about the firing of Mr. Knighton,” Wilson said. “There never was on my part. There never will be. It will simply be based upon Mr. Knighton’s ability to get things done ... to execute at a high level.”

Knighton told the AJC that while city administrators are hired in a political environment, he was brought to the city for his experience, knowledge and ability to lead.

“I see so much potential here,” Knighton said. “I’m looking forward to an opportunity to serve the mayor and city council and ultimately the citizens of Roswell, to write that next chapter in Roswell’s history. Hopefully in about a year ... we will be able to talk about all the things that have been accomplished.”

Roswell limits apartment growth along major corridors

ROSWELL, Ga. — The Roswell City Council took another step March 28 to move the city away from high-density, multi-family apartments along its major corridors.The council voted unanimously to adopt 16 text and map amendments to the city’s 2040 Comprehensive Plan that will promote additional mixed-use projects.The comprehensive plan provides long-range policy direction for land use, transportation, economic development, housing, public facilities, intergovernmental agreements and natural or cultural resources.O...

ROSWELL, Ga. — The Roswell City Council took another step March 28 to move the city away from high-density, multi-family apartments along its major corridors.

The council voted unanimously to adopt 16 text and map amendments to the city’s 2040 Comprehensive Plan that will promote additional mixed-use projects.

The comprehensive plan provides long-range policy direction for land use, transportation, economic development, housing, public facilities, intergovernmental agreements and natural or cultural resources.

One of the new amendments removes residential townhouse and multi-family zoning along the Holcomb Bridge Character Area in favor of parkway village, a designation that preserves the historic rural character of the area by saving trees and promoting pedestrian-friendly amenities.

Another removes civic zoning from compatible future zonings of the estate residential character area. Civic uses include anything from poultry farms and places of worship to helicopter pads, government buildings, cell towers and schools.

Two other amendments change the Arnold Mill Road, Cagle Road, Etris Road and Cox Road area from neighborhood service and neighborhood residential to suburban residential, and remove industrial flex from future zonings of the Highway 9 Character Area.

Councilman Mike Palermo said the amendments do not change any of the existing zonings but are intended to provide clarity to developers on what the City Council prefers in terms of mapping, zoning categories and best uses on a property. Palermo said a developer can still request to rezone a property, and the City Council can then decide to deny or approve the request with conditions.

The 2040 Comprehensive Plan was adopted on Oct. 12, 2021. However, the former mayor and City Council initiated a slate of proposed amendments nearly a month later, and a neighborhood meeting was held on Jan. 13, 2022, to gather public input.

The Georgia Department of Community Affairs requires all local governments to update their comprehensive plan every five years. Palermo said Community Development Director Jason Gaines suggested it is common practice for city officials to make changes before that period to ensure it aligns with the views of the community.

Claire Snedeker, who served on the stakeholder committee for the 2040 Comprehensive Plan, said one goal was to make residential zoning categories available in multiple character areas in the city rather than making a one-size-fits-all in just one character area.

Still, a group of residents spoke for nearly three hours at the March 28 City Council meeting both in favor and opposition to the amendments. One group claimed the amendments would worsen the housing shortage and cause housing prices and rental rates to increase. Another faction said the amendments would help to attract more businesses.

The latest S&P CoreLogic Case-Shiller Index reports some home prices in 20 major cities rose 19 percent in January from a year ago, and in Atlanta, prices rose 22 percent. Residential real estate costs have continued to climb because of a shortage of homes on the market and pent-up demand from buyers amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

East Roswell resident Elizabeth Goldsmith, who has been a Fulton County teacher for 26 years, said she knows many local teachers who have left their jobs for cities like Alpharetta and Woodstock because they cannot afford to live in Roswell. In the past, employers, like restaurants, have also indicated they cannot find workers willing to drive from other cities to staff service industry jobs.

But City Councilman Peter Vanstrom said Roswell needs commercial business to offset the tax burden on residents. He suggested using the city’s redevelopment space as one way to do that.

“Mixed-use is a great way to make and maximize the value of the land that’s there, and we have to work with the developers to get that done,” Vanstrom said. “… We’re not anti-apartments by any stretch. We’re trying to be stewards of the redevelopment that needs to happen in this town that is going to be most beneficial for all residents.”

During his campaign for City Council, Vanstrom said he would not support building any more high-density apartments. He cited residential projects, such as the development at Sun Valley Road, as a total failure. The project, approved in 2017, was set to replace an 18-acre shopping center with a grocery store, office, retail, restaurant space and up to 300 apartment units. In the end, only the apartments were built.

Mayor Kurt Wilson also said that Roswell has historically and “dramatically” done more for affordable housing than any other sister city in North Fulton County except for Sandy Springs, because it has a housing authority. He said 35 percent of Roswell’s housing is rental, with the vast majority being garden-style apartments.

“A city does have the right to clear its own destiny in terms of how it wants to grow and how it wants to build out,” Wilson said. “There are some cities who make a decision to say we’re going to be high-density stand-alone multi-family apartments. This city, Roswell, is not going to grow that way.”

East Roswell resident Jason Sabatino, who also served on the stakeholder committee for the 2040 Comprehensive Plan, agreed.

He referenced a map in a recent Atlanta Business Chronicle article that showed Roswell as an island for affordable housing in the North Atlanta area. The article analyzed home values and mortgage data to estimate where homeowners would require the most income to afford a home. In Roswell, it was under $100,000.

“So, when I hear people talk about affordability and we need to have more affordable housing, we are the affordable housing option already in the North Fulton, North Atlanta area,” Sabatino said. “… We are not removing apartments anywhere. We are simply stating that certain zoning types need to be considered for certain places in the city.”

Roswell resident John Evans said he would like to see the city stick to a plan for future growth. He cited the Holcomb Bridge Road East Revitalization Study, which states that more than 50 percent of East Roswell is made up of apartments. He questioned why then in 2019, the City Council approved a plan to replace an empty Super Target on Holcomb Bridge Road with more than 400 apartments and townhomes.

“There’s a stark difference between the development that’s going on in East Roswell versus West Roswell, and I think that the Target exemplifies that, because we’re moving away from any kind of businesses that are there,” Evans said. “… It seems to me that what you’re doing now is very important as you figure out what it is you want to do, where you want apartments, what kind of apartments you want, and I encourage you to stick to that.”

Palermo made the motion to approve the resolution, which was seconded by Councilwoman Christine Hall. It passed 5-0, with Councilman Marcelo Zapata having an excused absence.

The amendments will now go to the Georgia Department of Community Affairs and the Atlanta Regional Commission for approval.

Roswell City Council approves Verizon data center expansion

ROSWELL, Ga. — In the face of neighbors’ continued protests over noise concerns, the Roswell City Council unanimously approved a request by Verizon to connect its data center on Turner Road to an existing facility in Alpharetta.The move comes six months after Verizon submitted a request to have the property at 10325 Turner Road rezoned from office professional to civic and institutional. The company also sought a conditional use for a major utility facility.City planning staff has said the use of a major utility sho...

ROSWELL, Ga. — In the face of neighbors’ continued protests over noise concerns, the Roswell City Council unanimously approved a request by Verizon to connect its data center on Turner Road to an existing facility in Alpharetta.

The move comes six months after Verizon submitted a request to have the property at 10325 Turner Road rezoned from office professional to civic and institutional. The company also sought a conditional use for a major utility facility.

City planning staff has said the use of a major utility should be less intense than other uses allowed in civic and institutional zoning, or even uses allowed under office professional zoning.

At the outset, staff recommended approval of the requests with conditions, but when the matter went before the Roswell City Council in December, a group of residents said they were worried about the noise the 50,800-square-foot facility would emit and how that could affect their property values.

The request was deferred for 90 days.

On March 14, David Kirk with the law firm Troutman Pepper Hamilton Sanders said Verizon has since made substantial modifications to its initial plans. Now, rather than housing three 18,100-square-foot pods with two diesel generators each, the facility will only have two pods built in phases. The land on the southern half of the property where the third pod had been proposed will not be developed.

The revised site plan also includes 50 parking spaces, 14,500 square feet of office space and a 40-foot neighborhood compatibility buffer along the back of the property, where the Turner Road right-of-way and a residential subdivision are located.

Kirk said the equipment yard in the back of the building on the western side of the property will be enclosed with 16-foot masonry screen walls, and a brick screen wall will be installed in the front of the building along the equipment yard.

Additionally, there are several retaining walls proposed for the site. The one located next to the neighborhood compatibility buffer will be a soil nail retaining wall, and several others will be placed in the front of the building on the eastern side of the property along the access road. The retaining walls will range in height with the highest points being 8 feet and 8.5 feet.

In a Jan. 28 letter to the Planning and Zoning Department, Senior Project Manager Katherine McGah with Morrison Hershfield, said the new facility is needed to keep pace with the ever-expanding need for mobile phones and digital services.

“As the workforce continues to transition to ‘remote’ work environments, the need for Verizon’s services will continue to grow,” McGah wrote. “This is in perfect alignment with the Imagine Roswell 2035 Comprehensive Plan goal to ‘expand high tech infrastructure.’”

While the Planning Commission recommended approval of the rezoning and conditional use in February, the City Council on March 14 added 14 conditions.

They include covering the roof with as many solar panels as they can fit and using generators identical to the Verizon standard data center in San Diego, California. The conditions also prohibit shining any lights on residential properties, testing generators more than one hour and 15 minutes per week and receiving deliveries between 7 p.m. and 7 a.m. The company is required to keep the undisturbed southern half of the property unfenced.

Before approving the request, residents made one final pitch to the City Council, imploring them not to go through with it.

Justin Reynolds, who spoke in opposition to the project in December, reiterated that his chief concern was with noise.

“A data center is nothing like an office park, and I don’t think that’s been made clear yet,” Reynolds said. “This is an industrial data center, which will produce a great amount of noise from the diesel generators and industrial HVAC equipment. … Yes, the world is going to need more data centers, but it makes absolutely no sense to have a data center right in the middle of a peaceful residential area.”

Jan Viviani, who has lived at Barrington Farms since 1992, said that while she’s appreciative of some of the changes Verizon made, she still opposes the project.

“I would implore you to think about this,” Viviani said. “This community has been there for a very long time. There are established residents there that this is going to impact. … Would you want to live in any of those homes on that back edge and look out on this facility?”

The next City Council meeting is slated for 7 p.m. March 28 at City Hall.

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