Dental assisting school in Sandy Springs, GA

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A Bright Future Lies Ahead

A wise person once said, "The only way to do great work is to love what you do. If you haven't found it yet, keep looking. Don't settle."

At Dental Assisting 101, we believe that everyone deserves a chance to enjoy a career doing what they love. Unfortunately, many men and women in Georgia settle for soulless, thankless jobs with no upward mobility. If you are stuck in a job just to pay the bills, your opportunity to make a change and build a better life is here.

Unlike traditional colleges, we offer our students an expedited pathway to success through a hands-on educational approach where students learn by doing. One of the best ways to secure your future and set yourself up for success is to learn from the best. That's exactly what you'll get when you enroll in our dental assisting school in Sandy Springs, GA. We pride ourselves on having one of the most effective dental assisting courses in the state, where most students find a position within 60 days of graduation.

When it comes to decisions, choosing a new career path is one of the most important of your life. It's not an easy choice, and it can be even harder to juggle your current responsibilities while you study and attend class. That is why we offer both in-person and online course structures, focusing on teaching practical skills that you will use every day as a dental assistant. When you choose Assisting 101, you can rest easy knowing you won't spend valuable time trying to discern complicated lectures or irrelevant tasks. Instead, you will learn crucial skills that will set you apart from your peers and help you begin a new life-changing career in the dental industry.

When you enroll in our dental assisting school, you will reap the benefits of:

  • Flexible schedules for working adults and first-time students
  • Practical training that will teach you the skills necessary to flourish as a dental assistant
  • Knowledgeable dental faculty who want you to succeed
  • Access to your instructor 24-hours a day, 7-days a week
  • Affordable tuition with low payment plan opportunities
  • In-depth career prep to get you ready for a job in the dental industry
  • Resume help and job interview coaching

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Dental Assistant School Sandy Springs, GA
 Dental Assistant Course Sandy Springs, GA

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Choosing Your Dental Assisting Course In Sandy Springs, GA

At Assisting 101, students have their choice of two unique dental assisting programs in Sandy Springs. Both programs consist of 78 hours of lecture and 48 hours of in-depth, hands-on training at one of the best dental offices in metro Atlanta. Both programs allow students to build a career in dentistry with the help of real dentists and dental assistants.

STUDENTS CAN CHOOSE FROM TWO DIFFERENT COURSE PROGRAMS: ON-SITE AND ONLINE.

Online Dental Assistant Course

Our online program is ideal for those students that like to complete training at their own pace. If you are an eager student willing to study every day and want to complete this program in as little as one month, you can do so. However, if you would like to take more time to manage other life responsibilities, you have the choice of completing this course in less than six months.

When you choose our online dental assisting course, you will have the opportunity to:

  • Begin classes at any time. With Assisting 101's online course structure, students may begin learning as soon as their registration is approved.
  • Obtain a customized welcome kit that includes your textbooks, studying materials, alginate impression kits, dentition models, x-ray kit, pouring model package, and scrubs. This way, you can experience hands-on learning from the comfort of your home.
  • Take 10 academic sessions online, totaling 78 hours of lecture time and 30 hours of hands-on training seminars.
  • Immerse yourself in the world of dental assisting, through educational lectures. These lectures contain demonstration videos, slide shows with instructor voice-overs, and rich illustrations to ensure you retain crucial skills and information.
  • Complete the course as quickly as you would like. Dedicated, hardworking students can finish our online dental assisting course in Sandy Springs, GA, within a month!
  • Use our externship placement services to help you discover local dental offices in need of interns to help you fulfill our course competencies. While not mandatory for graduation, an externship will help you better prepare for a long career in dentistry. An externship can also be an incredible way to network with industry professionals and work at an office that may hire you down the road.
  • Engage with your instructor, who will be with you every step of the way while you carve your path to a new, rewarding career.

On-Site Dental Assistant Course

Our on-site dental assisting program is perfect for students who do not have to travel long distances to our facility or need to "rush" to complete the course.

THIS PROGRAM IS MORE IN LINE WITH A TRADITIONAL COLLEGE EXPERIENCE AND GIVES STUDENTS THE OPPORTUNITY TO:

  • Immerse yourself in a traditional 10-week-long program consisting of training and in-office lectures each Saturday from 9AM until 5PM. On-site classes are conducted in an intimate teaching environment to ensure each student gets the attention they need and deserve.
  • Learn from successful dental professionals in our state-of-the-art dental assisting school in Sandy Springs, GA. Because this program is only offered four times a year, class space is very limited.
  • Get a basic understanding of common dental assisting techniques through lectures in the morning. You will put those techniques to use in our operatories in the afternoon, where you will practice real-world dental assistant duties.
  • Attend an orientation meeting, where you will receive your textbooks, studying materials, scrubs, and more.
  • Benefit from 48 hours of shadowing by our fully trained technicians and dental professionals. While you are being shadowed, your instructor will walk you through important procedures and teach you crucial skills needed for a fulfilling career as a dental assistant.
  • Build friendships and lifelong relationships with like-minded students who also want to begin a career in the dental industry.

Why Choose A Career In The Dental Industry?

According to the U.S Bureau of Labor Statistics, employment of dental assistants is expected to grow 11% over the next 10 years - faster than the average job growth of many other industries. New and ongoing evidence suggests an important link between a person's overall health and their oral health. Because of this, demand for dental-related services is expected to stay strong for years to come. Dental offices in Georgia and other states must meet this projected demand. As such, the need for trained dental assistants will continue to grow.

As Baby Boomers grow older and as more men and women practice good oral hygiene, the need to treat and maintain one's teeth will lead to an increased need for quality dental care. Over the next decade, the Bureau of Labor Statistics suggests that nearly 24,000 new dental assisting jobs will be created. That means the future is bright for any student who has been educated through our dental assisting courses in Sandy Springs.

QUICK FACTS ABOUT DENTAL ASSISTANT CAREERS OVER THE NEXT 10 YEARS

  • Rated #15 Out of 100 Best Health Care Support Jobs According to U.S News and World Report
  • Rated #84 Out of Best 100 Jobs in All of the United States
  • Average Salary: $40,080
  • Unemployment Rate: 2.4%
  • Number of Jobs: 23,400

What Does A Dental Assistant Do?

As a professional dental assistant, you will be tasked with managing a wide range of administrative and clinical responsibilities at a dental office. Dental assistants play a crucial role in the day-to-day workflow involved in a dental practice. They work alongside hygienists and dentists to provide patients with the highest quality oral care in the state of Georgia.

Common dental assistant job duties may include:

  • Assisting in the lab
  • Sterilizing dental equipment and tools
  • Ordering and organizing supplies for their dental office
  • Help perform x-rays
  • Maintain and organize patient dental records
  • Perform coronal polishing for patients
  • Provide fluoride treatments for patients
  • Help educate patients about how to maintain their oral health
  • Help educate patients about best practices relating to proper oral hygiene
  • Providing assistance to dentists and hygienists during cleanings
  • Greet patients and make them feel comfortable
  • Collect important info from new and existing patients
 Dental Assistant Classes Sandy Springs, GA

Why Attend a Dental Assisting School In Sandy Springs, GA?

They say the best way to predict the future is to create it, and that is exactly what you will be doing when you enroll at Assisting 101. We believe in getting our students ready for a lifelong career, not just a job that pays the bills. When you attend our award-winning dental assisting school, you are investing in a future rich with opportunity.

Unlike other workers who choose not to attend school for legitimate training, our students enjoy a quick start in a vibrant job market where financial and personal growth are common. When you become a dental assistant after graduation, you will have confidence knowing you are well-prepared for a life-changing career.

HERE ARE SOME OF THE MOST COMMON REASONS WHY OUR STUDENTS SAY THEY CHOOSE TO ATTEND OUR DENTAL ASSISTING SCHOOL:

Happy Career! Happy Life!

Dental Assistant School Sandy Springs, GA

WORK IN AN EVER-GROWING INDUSTRY

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics recently reported that job growth for dental assistants is growing at a faster rate than most other industries. This bodes well for our students, who will have job security as they navigate the workforce. In a time where many jobs are being replaced by robotics and other technological advances, the skills that you learn at Assisting 101 can help you for the rest of your life.

 Dental Assistant Course Sandy Springs, GA

FULFILLING BALANCE BETWEEN LIFE AND WORK

The work/life balance in the U.S is a problem. Spending every waking hour at the office instead of home with family can be draining at best and depressing at worst. Unlike other professionals, dental assistants typically enjoy normal working hours during the business week. That means they have more free time to dedicate to their children and families.

 Dental Assistant Program Sandy Springs, GA

ABILITY TO MAKE A DIFFERENCE

When you are a dental assistant, you plan a crucial role in your dental office. But as an ambassador of the profession, you also help educate patients about the benefits of good oral hygiene. Given the ties between heart health and oral health, you are making more of a difference than you might realize.

 Dental Assistant Sandy Springs, GA

OPPORTUNITY FOR PROFESSIONAL GROWTH

When students graduate from Assisting 101 and accept a job as a dental assistant, many choose to make it their lifelong career. For others, the role of dental assistant is just the beginning - a steppingstone to a role with more responsibility. After only a few years as a dental assistant in Sandy Springs, the chance to become a manager or supervisor will become much more likely. The sky is the limit!

Latest News in Sandy Springs, GA

Hands to Heal GA raising funds for program to help youth cope with stress, anxiety

SANDY SPRINGS, Ga. (Atlanta Now News at 10) – Reports show kids returning to school are dealing with more mental health issues than ever, and a local non-profit is launching a program to provide some relief.Kendall White, 15, is an athlete at Norcross High School and a client at Medical & Sports Massage, where Denise Leslie, the founder and CEO of the practice, has provided therapy for pain and stress for 10 years.READ MORE: ...

SANDY SPRINGS, Ga. (Atlanta Now News at 10) – Reports show kids returning to school are dealing with more mental health issues than ever, and a local non-profit is launching a program to provide some relief.

Kendall White, 15, is an athlete at Norcross High School and a client at Medical & Sports Massage, where Denise Leslie, the founder and CEO of the practice, has provided therapy for pain and stress for 10 years.

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“I train a lot as an athlete, and I recognize that recovery is definitely going to be a part of my development, and Denise has helped me with all my aches and pains in getting through sports and school,” White said. “Balancing training for sports and all the schoolwork, especially with advanced classes, can be very stressful for students,” she said.

Leslie provides mainly physical therapy for White, but she says there’s an urgent need to address the mental health issues youth are facing. “The students that I see have an enormous amount of stress and anxiety, and it shows itself through fatigue, lack of focus, lack of personal hygiene,” said Leslie.

She plans to do a stress and anxiety study on ten youth, between the ages of 12 and 24, through a year-long research program. Her non-profit, Hands to Heal GA, is raising $20,000 to provide these services at no cost.

“We’re going to be teaching mindful meditation, we’re going to be doing restorative yoga, and we’re going to teach the students how to journal,” Leslie said.

READ MORE:

A CDC report released in March showed more than one-third of high school students reported they experienced poor mental health during the COVID-19 pandemic in 2021, and more than 40% reported they felt persistently sad or hopeless.

School counselors and administrators witness the problems first-hand, including Keisha Gibbons, the assistant principal at Jean Childs Young Middle School in Atlanta Public Schools. “We’re experiencing the whole gamut, from students having low self-esteem, to students that are having social skills issues,” she said, explaining how the issues have a negative impact on their academics.

Gibbons helped launch The Den at Young Middle School to address the crisis by providing therapy, counselors and social workers.

Leslie says her program will provide additional options. “We’re going to be able to show through this work that we’re able to stabilize the symptoms and also get to the root cause of the trauma,” she said.

School officials welcome more options. “When we have creative minds with innovative thoughts and resources, that is what’s going to change the trajectory of what our students are experiencing,” said Gibbons.

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Hands to Heal GA hopes to meet its fundraising goal by December. For more information, click here.

Revamp of Athens' parks and trails underway or planned as sales tax pennies roll in

Athens' parks and trails are among the beneficiaries of funding set aside in the latest SPLOST. The sales tax dollars will allow for upgrades to include a renovations to recreational water features, a new sewer line, more shade a dog parks, water fountains, renovated playgrounds, a boat launch and a reconstructed Murmur THere is a breakdown of some of the projects already underway and planned for the future:Bishop ParkThe schematic designs for Bishop Park improvements recently were approved by Athens-Cla...

Athens' parks and trails are among the beneficiaries of funding set aside in the latest SPLOST. The sales tax dollars will allow for upgrades to include a renovations to recreational water features, a new sewer line, more shade a dog parks, water fountains, renovated playgrounds, a boat launch and a reconstructed Murmur T

Here is a breakdown of some of the projects already underway and planned for the future:

Bishop Park

The schematic designs for Bishop Park improvements recently were approved by Athens-Clarke County commissioners. About $3.8 million was set aside for those upgrades.

The schematic designs looks at the pool at Bishop Park, the largest and most heavily used pool in Athens, as well as the only pool available for swim-team activities.

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Fines for Marijuana:Athens-Clarke commission eliminates jail time, sets $35 fine for marijuana possession

At the government's request, a group of local residents who used the pool came up with a list of “must haves” for the new design, which included replacing the current pool, remodeling the pool house and addressing use of the pool for competition swim, recreational swim and aquatic programs.

The design being sent to the commission shows an eight-lane competition pool, a leisure pool and bleachers. In a meeting this month, commissioners approved changes to the initial plans to include more pool lanes, diving boards and a splash pad.

A tentative schedule was laid out for how long the project will take:

Memorial Park

At Memorial Park, Athens residents will see active construction, including a new sewer line project and upgrades to the dog park, according to Kent Kilpatrick, director of Athens-Clarke Leisure Services.

He said the dog park is closed due to the construction and it could be spring before it reopens.

As far as the sewer project, Kilpatrick explained that the current system is old and catches stormwater runoff from the Five Points neighborhood.

Athens officials recently proposed finding a means to add shade to the dog park, and to install water fountains at Memorial and Bishop parks.

Sandy Creek Park

Kilpatrick said Sandy Creek Park is under the “conceptual design” phase for its improvement project. The project is for an all inclusive playground.

“Sandy Creek Park has ... two of our oldest playgrounds in our entire park system,” said Kilpatrick.

The goal is to replace the playground beside the beach, which Kilpatrick said is perhaps the most popular playground.

Sandy Creek Nature Center is also being revamped. Kilpatrick said that some of the older exhibits are being refurbished through SPLOST funding.

While that project is currently under way, it is in the design and planning stages. Kilpatrick said that the work will be scheduled either late this year or early next year.

Trails: Firefly, Oconee Waterway, and Greenway

Several trail projects are under way, with the Firefly trail in phase three involving land acquisition. Also, the reconstruction of the Murmur Trestle is a particular focus at this time.

Demolition of the old Murmur Trestle, as it is called due to the inclusion of its image on the album cover of R.E.M.'s debut album "Murmur", took place last year due to the poor condition of the wood. In its place is a new steel and wood structure currently under construction.

Trestle Removed:Athens' 'Murmur Trestle' being removed, replaced as part of Firefly Trail construction

Firefly Trail and the Trestle:Athens-Clarke taking next steps in Firefly Trail project. Here's how the R.E.M. trestle will be incorporated.

This new trestle will house part of the Firefly Trail, a 39-mile “rail-trail” that will run through Clarke, Oglethorpe and Greene counties, following an abandoned rail bed between Athens and Union Point.

Kilpatrick called the construction of the new trestle “fascinating” and “spectacular” to watch.

“[We’re] trying to recapture the whole historic railroad bridge that was there before. And it's modernizing it a little bit, but also trying to capture some of that same look,” said Kilpatrick. “So they can actually see that bridge and construction which is quite a fascinating project going on currently.”

Meanwhile, a full water trail for the Oconee River is in the conceptual stage. A "Macon Highway Boat Launch Project" that would provide access to the Middle Oconee River for canoes and kayaks and would complete the first segment of the Middle Oconee Water Trail.

An extension to the Greenway trail is also under construction in Oconee Hill Cemetery.

“You could go into that beautiful historic cemetery and see how the Greenway trail is going to be following the river through the cemetery,” said Kilpatrick

2020 SPLOST projects

The newest iteration of the SPLOST has several approved projects for Athens parks, including a future Athens West Park on the west side of Athens. Not all projects, however, are under way.

Kilpatrick explained that as SPLOST money comes in, funding will be directed to various projects, and noted that some projects may not be funded for several years.

There is a current general park improvement project with a $6.7 million fund that can go toward any park for repairs and maintenance.

"We are fortunate in this community that we've got parks that are just loved to death and to that point, some of these parks are 30- to 40-years-old or older," said Kilpatrick. "So those funds help repave some parking lots where they're cracked or broken, or replace some pieces of playgrounds."

Kilpatrick said that the next project to be kicked off is at Beech Haven. This is a $4.5 million project to improve the park.

The first stage of the improvements would be creating a master plan for that site, with Kilpatrick saying that he hopes that master planning process begins in 2023. Following that, development of the first phase could take place in 2025.

Some of the ideas for Beech Haven, if funds allow them, include:

Other parks slated to have improvement projects funded by SPLOST include Tallassee Forest Nature Preserve, Bear Hollow Zoo and Holland Park.

“But those are all several years down the road because the money's got to be spread out,” said Kilpatrick.

Aqua-Tots Swim Schools Coming Soon to Sandy Springs, Georgia

The world's largest swim school franchise to open eighth Atlanta-area learn-to-swim facility Aqua-Tots Swim Schools is preparing to open a 6,300 square foot, state-of-the-art swim school in Sandy Springs, Georgia, to serve families in Atlanta, Sandy Springs and Buckhead.SANDY SPRINGS, Ga., Aug. 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Aqua-Tots Swim Schools, the world's largest swim school franchise, has announced its newest franchise location, opening soon in Sandy Springs, Georgia. Located at 5290 Roswell Road, at the intersection of ...

The world's largest swim school franchise to open eighth Atlanta-area learn-to-swim facility

Aqua-Tots Swim Schools is preparing to open a 6,300 square foot, state-of-the-art swim school in Sandy Springs, Georgia, to serve families in Atlanta, Sandy Springs and Buckhead.

SANDY SPRINGS, Ga., Aug. 11, 2022 /PRNewswire/ -- Aqua-Tots Swim Schools, the world's largest swim school franchise, has announced its newest franchise location, opening soon in Sandy Springs, Georgia. Located at 5290 Roswell Road, at the intersection of Roswell and Mt. Paran Roads, Aqua-Tots Sandy Springs is scheduled to open in November 2022 as the eighth Atlanta-area location.

Aqua-Tots Swim Schools has been the leader in the swim instruction industry since 1991, offering comprehensive swim curriculum for children as early as four months old. With over 125 locations in 14 countries, families all over the world can experience dedicated, year-round, indoor swim facilities where their children can become safe and confident swimmers by completing the proven Aqua-Tots curriculum.

Aqua-Tots Sandy Springs is the thirteenth location for business partners, Andrew George, Jesse Rhodenbaugh and Tommy Fisher, who also own schools in North Carolina and Virginia. Upon opening the state-of-the-art 6,300 square foot facility, they will be ready to serve families in the Atlanta, Sandy Springs and Buckhead communities.

"The Atlanta community is already family to us, and Sandy Springs continues to grow with many children in the area," said Rhodenbaugh. "Giving these families a neighborhood swim school will make the entire community safer. We're excited to offer Aqua-Tots' proven curriculum as we raise up safe and confident swimmers for many years to come."

In fact, participation in formal swim lessons can reduce the risk of drowning by 88% among children ages one to four years old, according to the National Institutes of Health. This is a proactive solution as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that drowning is the leading cause of unintentional, injury-related death among children in the same age group.

Those who pre-enroll in swim lessons prior to opening will lock in founder's pricing for as long as they are enrolled in lessons. Families can call to reserve a spot in small group (4:1 ratio), semi-private (2:1 ratio) or private (1:1 ratio) lessons before classes fill up.

Aqua-Tots Sandy Springs is also hiring swim instructors and front desk staff. "One of the amazing things about being a small business owner is bringing jobs to our area," said Rhodenbaugh. "We look forward to getting to know people in the community and building a team who is ready and willing to serve them with lifesaving swim lessons."

Those interested can apply at aqua-tots.com/sandy-springs/employment. Anyone interested in learning more about Aqua-Tots Sandy Springs or to sign up for swim lessons can visit aqua-tots.com/sandy-springs.

About Aqua-Tots Swim Schools

Aqua-Tots Swim Schools serves over 120 communities worldwide, offering dedicated, year-round, indoor swim instruction, community outreach and drowning prevention education to children of all abilities from four months to 12 years old. As the world's largest swim school franchise that is continuing to grow with 90 locations in development, Aqua-Tots' hand-selected instructors are passionate about teaching children how to remain safer in and around the water. The company uses tried and true curriculum, more than 30 years in the making and trusted worldwide to teach five million swim lessons annually. To learn more, visit aqua-tots.com or follow Aqua-Tots on Facebook and Instagram.

MEDIA CONTACT

Mike Steele(770) 325-3380[email protected]

Amy Lofgreen(480) 621-32263423[email protected]

SOURCE Aqua-Tots Sandy Springs

Commentary: ‘I cannot support using taxpayer dollars on a Cultural Arts Center’

Editor’s Note: This op-ed is from Jody Reichel, the District 4 representative on the Sandy Springs City Council. Sandy Springs is considering using public funds to build a Cultural Arts Center to house the Anne Frank Exhibit and a Holocaust Memorial. I wholeheartedly support the mission of the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust and educational initiatives rel...

Editor’s Note: This op-ed is from Jody Reichel, the District 4 representative on the Sandy Springs City Council.

Sandy Springs is considering using public funds to build a Cultural Arts Center to house the Anne Frank Exhibit and a Holocaust Memorial. I wholeheartedly support the mission of the Georgia Commission on the Holocaust and educational initiatives related to human rights and justice. Based on what has and has not been presented to the City Council, I cannot support using taxpayer dollars on a Cultural Arts Center as it is currently conceived.

I will outline the considerations underlying my perspective.

Financial stewardship of the City

I have a duty as an elected representative to be a responsible steward of public funds. With that duty in mind, the proposed project raises several financial issues that require further deliberation before undertaking a project of this consequence. As of today, I cannot determine what this project would cost the city. Greenlighting a project without knowing its cost is fiscally irresponsible, separate, and apart from the project’s merits.

We don’t have a feasibility study to guide the proposal’s economic impact. Such a study would allow us to project revenues and expenses, including costs for added security. All area synagogues maintain paid security due to threats of violence, and the project may require similar enhanced security measures.

The most recent data on the operation of the previous Anne Frank Exhibit at Parkside Shops indicated that 7,000 visitors per year attended the Exhibit. That number consists primarily of students. The Georgia Commission on the Holocaust asserts that the Anne Frank Museum, once completed, could expect 20,000 – 40,000 annual visitors. By context, the Houston Holocaust Museum, the fourth largest in the U.S. at 57,000 square feet (eight times the size of the proposed Sandy Springs Exhibit), has 163,000 annual visitors, of which 44,000 are students. It has total functional yearly expenses of $7.5 million per public record.

Sandy Springs currently operates the Performing Arts Center at a $2 million annual loss. Before undertaking another project for which we don’t have a study, the city should ensure that the Performing Arts Center stabilizes financially.

Without a feasibility and cost study, the City must refrain from making an unknown financial commitment until and unless we have more considered information.

What is best for the Anne Frank Museum?

The Anne Frank Museum is culturally and educationally important, and its ultimate location should befit its importance and provide it with the stature worthy of its relevance. Again, the Houston Holocaust Museum is instructive. The Houston Museum is located, fittingly, in the museum district in Midtown Houston, housed near the Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Natural Science.

Given that analogy, it’s reasonable to locate the Anne Frank Museum in one of the following locations: the Bremen Jewish Museum in Midtown, the Museum of History and Holocaust Education at Kennesaw State University, or adjacent to or within the Civil Rights Museum in downtown. To quote one constituent on the issue, the Museum “deserves a contextually correct placement.” The placement along Bluestone Road lacks physical prominence, at odds with the gravitas that the Museum should convey.

It is critical to point out that these other locations are not pipe dreams but completely realistic. Bremen has already stated that they would welcome the Anne Frank Museum exhibits. Kennesaw already has an existing museum that could house the collection. Asking what’s best for the Anne Frank Museum is the responsible approach. A more considered approach to identifying the proper home can be found in the New York Times article titled, U.S. Holocaust Museums Are Updating Content and Context.

As described in the article, sixteen Holocaust Museums are currently operating in the US. The Shoah Foundation, established by Steven Spielberg, acts as a partner and consultant to the Holocaust Memorial Resource and Education Center of Florida, set to open in Orlando in 2024. The article further states that some of the sixteen museums are teaming with the Shoah Foundation and looking to it for direction.

The Georgia Commission on the Holocaust should consider such a consultative relationship with the Shoah Foundation so that the Anne Frank Museum can achieve its objectives.

What’s best for the City?

My constituents and other citizens of Sandy Springs have provided significant input. Their consensus is that they are not clamoring for the Anne Frank Museum but strongly prefer creating trails, parks, and a thriving downtown with restaurants, retail, and recreational amenities. The city also needs to confront pressing issues, including a lack of sidewalks, stormwater planning, and thoughtful development in the northern part of the city.

The city has pressing needs that are now unmet. Approving this museum without a feasibility study would be the wrong choice for Sandy Springs.

Voice your opinion

The Sandy Springs City Council is voting on the terms of the Cultural Center proposal at its next meeting on August 16 at 6:00 p.m. The public is invited and encouraged to attend. You can register in advance by filling out the public comment card or sign up at the meeting. The meeting is in the Studio Theatre at Sandy Springs City Hall (1 Galambos Way, Sandy Springs, GA 30328).

Sandy Springs wants to put composting bins in backyards

Sandy Springs will apply for a $95,000 grant to start a pilot composting program designed to reduce solid waste.Sustainability Manager Catherine Mercier-Baggett said Sept. 30 is the application deadline for the grant, which is being administered by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division’s Recovered Materials Unit.Grant awards will be made in January 2023 and the city would not have to provide matching funds.“There is between 20 and 30% of all household waste that is actually organic materials that can ...

Sandy Springs will apply for a $95,000 grant to start a pilot composting program designed to reduce solid waste.

Sustainability Manager Catherine Mercier-Baggett said Sept. 30 is the application deadline for the grant, which is being administered by the Georgia Environmental Protection Division’s Recovered Materials Unit.

Grant awards will be made in January 2023 and the city would not have to provide matching funds.

“There is between 20 and 30% of all household waste that is actually organic materials that can be composted. So you can imagine that means we would be taking to the curb a lot less garbage,” she said.

The city’s program would have two different aspects. Three centralized collection sites would have bins where residents could drop off their organic materials, which a third party would empty.

“For those who want to try to do this at home, we also would have about 1,000 bins that would be available for anyone who wants to try it in their backyard,” Mercier-Baggett said.

The grant application is being made with Dunwoody.

“We had a conversation and realize that they were looking at exactly the same thing that we are but at a smaller scale. So we’re partnering with them on the application,” she said.

The Master Gardeners of North Fulton and DeKalb County, Keep Beautiful organizations in North Fulton and DeKalb, and UGA Extension offices in the two counties will help educate the public on the program, she said.

The total grant request may change after conversations with Dunwoody, she said.

“After those two years, we would have to figure out first of all if we want to continue with this and also find a mechanism to keep it financially stable,” Mercier-Baggett said. “The quote that we received so far is $21,000 per year for three locations and that includes bringing back the compost to the community.”

“One of the concerns I would have at the drop-off locations is making sure that it’s picked up on a regular basis because it gets rather unsightly if it stacks up there,” Mayor Rusty Paul said.

He said many people do yardwork on the weekend and what they drop off may sit at the collection sites until the end of the week, which could cause problems.

Mercier-Baggett said she’s not certain that yard waste would be accepted because of the volume generated in the region. Food scraps and cardboard typically are accepted.

“The complaints I’ve heard about composting in the in the past is with food scraps and winding up with a lot of critters,” Councilmember Tibby DeJulio said.

He asked what is planned to solve that problem because nobody wants it in their backyard or area because of the “critters.”

The bins will be rolling carts that will close. The program has budgeted funds for some kind of enclosure or fencing for the collection site bins, Mercier-Baggett said.

“The company that we talked to has not had any issues with that because they are collecting twice a week,” Mercier-Baggett said.

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